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Lecture 5

PSY328H5 Lecture 5: Lecture 5
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSY328H5
Professor
Will Huggon

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Lecture 5 - Eyewitness Testimony
confabulation - the act of making something up that you believe to be a memoryschema/scripts
- the way our brain has put together our experience/perception - based on generalized stereotypes
(dog)
Memory Construction- 2 layers of filter of our subjectivity that can add or take away from or
distort our memory - very easily done & we believe it - memory is strongly influenced by our
views, attitudes, and beliefs at the time of recall- we create rationalizations/ excuses to support
our memories whether they are true or not "I didn't go, I was probably tired" - psychologists can't
tell the difference between real & implanted memories- ex - Jack Ramsay RCMP Saskatchewan
- 14yo FN to station after curfew -"virgin?" "no" - he says he took her home - she says he
sexually assaulted her, memory repressed for 10yrs then remembered when she saw him @ a
funeral - BUT he wasn't in the province = undermined her credibility - he lost his MP job but no
jail time or record - must be source misattribution from her other sexual assault
Elizabeth Loftus- asked kids to imagine getting lost in a mall when they hadn't - 6w later 1 truly
believe it - same with mousetrap (Band-Aid)
3
- video of car hitting bike - either a stop sign or yield - then asked opposite "yield?" - then asked
which picture they saw (S/Y) - majority remembered the sign that was asked in the question,
which was the opposite sign they had seen in the video- twice as many subjects remembered
seeing broken glass at the accident scene when 'smash' was used (onomatopoeia)-
misinformation effect
- providing misinformation by asking questions in a way that biases the memory of the witness-
having witness overhear a convo bwn other subjects (confederates) - more convincing bc you dk
you're being influenced
False Identification- eyewitness testimony is the most powerful piece of evidence, second to a
confession- experts are only 50% accurate at identifying someone - we think we can 100% ID,
so the witness must be able to also - 75 - 80% of wrongful convictions are because of eyewitness
misidentification- The Innocence Project- Association of the Defense for the Wrongfully
Convicted
Eyewitness Testimony- had subjects watch a robbery/murder case - 18% conviction - then
added a witness = 72%, fell to only 68% when discredited - set up the conditions so the witness
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Description
Lecture 5 Eyewitness Testimony confabulation the act of making something up that you believe to be a memory schemascripts the way our brain has put together our experienceperception based on generalized stereotypes (dog) Memory Construction 2 layers of filter of our subjectivity that can add or take away from or distort our memory very easily done we believe it memory is strongly influenced by our views, attitudes, and beliefs at the time of recall we create rationalizations excuses to support our memories whether they are true or not I didnt go, I was probably tired psychologists cant tell the difference between real implanted memories ex Jack Ramsay RCMP Saskatchewan 14yo FN to station after curfew virgin? no he says he took her home she says he sexually assaulted her, memory repressed for 10yrs then remembered when she saw him @ a funeral BUT he wasnt in the province = undermined her credibility he lost his MP job but no jail time or record must be source misattribution from her other sexual assault 1 Elizabeth Loftus asked kids to imagine getting lost in a mall when they hadnt 6w later truly believe it same with mousetrap (BandAid) 3 video of car hitting bike either a stop sign or yield then asked opposite yield? then asked which picture they saw (SY) majority remembered the sign that was asked in the question, which was the opposite sign they had seen in the video twice as many subjects remembered seeing broken glass at the accident scene when smash was used (onomatopoeia) misinformation effect providing misinformation by asking questions in a way that biases the memory of the witness having witness overhear a convo bwn other subjects (confederates) more convincing bc you dk youre being influenced False Identification eyewitness testimony is the most powerful piece of evidence, second to a confession experts are only 50 accurate at identifying someone we think we can 100 ID, so the witness must be able to also 75 80 of wrongful convictions are because of eyewitness misidentification The Innocence Project Association of the Defense for the Wrongfully Convicted Eyewitness Testimony had subjects watch a robberymurder case 18 conviction then added a witness = 72, fell to only 68 when discredited set up the conditions so the witness
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