PSY333H5 Lecture Notes - Homeostasis, Cortisol, Heart Rate Variability

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Published on 17 Apr 2013
School
UTM
Department
Psychology
Course
PSY333H5
Professor
The Brain & other Stuff Oct 25, 2012
- Hormones (slow) vs. electrical signals (fast).
- Autonomic nervous system: stress, via this system the brain gets ready and reacts
to threats.
- More psychologically focused, pupils dilated, glucose is released into
bloodstream.
- Parasympathetic: recovery after the stress has passed
The body’s ability to move back and forth from sympathetic and
parasympathetic activation is a very good indicator/predictor of
later disease.
- Brodmann’s areas: cellular structure stained to identify regions of the brain.
- Amygdala: emotional salience.
- Thalamus: every signal passes through the thalamus (decides if the signal is
important and where it should go).
Stress Oct 25, 2012
- Homeostasis: ex. body’s temperature has to be at a set point of 37°.
- Allostasis: configurations of the body change due to context (body adjusts to the
stress).
- ‘control the stress response properly’ – just like pain
Ability to regulate
Compromisers are predictors of disease
- Peripheral blood flow constricted: ex. hands get cold when nervous.
- Stresses that are unpredictable, uncontrollable tend to be perceived as high
stressful (people who have jobs that present unpredictable problems tend to feel
more stressful then people’s whose jobs are predictable).
- The more fit you are the lower your heart resting rate (70 on average).
Variation in every heartbeat.
SA: hearts natural pacemaker (brain sends signal to heart to beat).
Heart rate variability: (4th heart) rests and returns to baseline.
Heart rate speed increases/decreases through inhale/exhale that’s
why meditation works.
- Cortisol: important stress hormone
Important in reducing inflammation.
Higher cortisol levels = stress response.
Cortisol levels are different at different parts of the day.
Very high in the morning.
Used as a HPA marker.
- sAA = SAM marker.
Correlated with levels of circulating epinephrine and
norepinephrine (neurotransmitters that are released due to stress).
- Distinction between SAM and HPA activation?
SAM: involves the systems (epinephrine and norepinephrine) that
are like the fight or flight response.
HPA: activated constantly (not long-term, death will occur if it’s
activated long-term).
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Document Summary

Autonomic nervous system: stress, via this system the brain gets ready and reacts. More psychologically focused, pupils dilated, glucose is released into bloodstream. Parasympathetic: recovery after the stress has passed. The body"s ability to move back and forth from sympathetic and parasympathetic activation is a very good indicator/predictor of later disease. Brodmann"s areas: cellular structure stained to identify regions of the brain. Thalamus: every signal passes through the thalamus (decides if the signal is important and where it should go). Homeostasis: ex. body"s temperature has to be at a set point of 37 . Allostasis: configurations of the body change due to context (body adjusts to the stress). Control the stress response properly" just like pain. Peripheral blood flow constricted: ex. hands get cold when nervous. Stresses that are unpredictable, uncontrollable tend to be perceived as high stressful (people who have jobs that present unpredictable problems tend to feel more stressful then people"s whose jobs are predictable).

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