Class Notes (838,242)
Canada (510,788)
Sociology (4,081)
SOC205H5 (139)
Lecture 4

Lecture 4 soc205.docx

5 Pages
64 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC205H5
Professor
Paula Maurutto
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 4 2014­02­15 Test  Essay format: 1. What are the limits of this social theory? 2. How one theory differs from another? 3. What is the borne criminal or what is Sheldon body types, explain and define the significance  of that?   Part B: 1. Define and explain the significance of two concepts 1. Each worth of 5% and choose two and define and explain their significance.   Only responsible for PowerPoint slides and class, only focus on the theories.     Please refer to chapter 3 for details on the Chicago school and chapter 2 p, 20­21 for the classical  school.  They both define criminality different.  The classical school looks at the character of the person  who is capable and willing to be a criminal.  This is very much situated in the idea that criminals are  calculating and choose to break the law.  The Chicago School argued that the root cause of crime is  more social and is really a function of urban poverty. People learn to be criminal through social  interactions and through having legitimate goals but lacking the means to get it. Introduction: Control Theory • The question asked by control theorist: Why do people conform? o There were many Vietnam wars, draft chargers coming into Canada, strong peace movement  across Canada and US—there was a lot of social turmoil. o How do you create social theories in context to crime? Behaviour when there were so many  changes going around. o Why would you accept rules of gratification and go to school, why should people conform to  rules? It becomes the central focus of these groups.  o Criminality is a normal part of nature, and the desire to commit crime is a nature and what  needs to be claimed is how people resist from temptation. Control Theories • Hirschi Social Control Theory • Gottfredson & Hirschi’s General Theory of Crime • Social control refers to our ability to resists temptations; social controls are the external factors that help  us resist us from criminality. o Institutional factors: like prison. Early Social Control Theorists: Albert J. Reiss  Attempted to predict juvenile delinquency by explaining personal and social control 1. Personal control: the ability of the individual to refrain from meeting needs in ways which  conflict with the norms and rules of the community. 2. Social control: the ability of social groups or institutions to make norms or rules effective.  Early Control Theorists: F. Ivan Nye • Sought to explain why delinquent and criminal behaviour is not more common • Family most important social control over adolescents. • The family could generate: o Direct control: external forces o Internalized control: internal forces or conscience o Indirect control: extent of affection and identification with authority figures o Control through alternative means of need satisfaction: “Delivery of goods” in a legitimate way o These types of control are mutually reinforcing Neutralization and Drift theory: Sykes and Matza • If the social pressures causing delinquency were so powerful, why was it that even the worst of the  delinquents seemed to be fairly conventional people, actually conforming in so many other ways? • Why did most not continue law­violating behavior beyond a certain age? • Most people who engage in criminal behaviour are during 15­25, and then become law­abiding  individuals.  • They argue individuals do have a moral code but in their youth is when people are likely to suspend  their moral code. • Five Techniques of Neutralization (Table 5.2) 1. Denial of responsibility: my friends did it so I did 2. Denial of i
More Less

Related notes for SOC205H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit