Class Notes (835,722)
Canada (509,348)
Sociology (4,077)
SOC205H5 (139)
Lecture 10

Soc205 Lecture 10

10 Pages
160 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC205H5
Professor
Paula Maurutto
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 10 2014­04­05 Risk Assessment Andrew and Dowden Revolution in the ways criminal conduct is managed • • Re­establishing rehabilitation  • From ‘nothing works’ through ‘what works’ Part of Transition to Crime Control but with a focus on Rehabilitation • We are witnessing  an emergence and entrenchment of probabilistic reasoning in criminal justice  decision making, which is largely  discrediting clinical prediction. • Actuarial or quasi – actuarial tools make statistical predictions about the criminality of  groups or group traits to determine criminal justice outcomes for particular  individuals within those groups 1. Strong focus on crime control and also rehabilitation in Canada  2. Including statistical calculations into criminal justice making so you are not making decisions on  your own so you need to have statistics as a backup and strengthen your argument  3. Predict how likely will an individual recidivate—commit another crime.  Methodology • Review of the International and Canadian literatures on risk  • National interviews with over 120 practitioners (Crowns, defense counsel, policy, probation officers,  prison staff, risk tool developers, academics…) • Content analysis of risk tools, user manuals and policies on risk in Canada, and internationally • Review and analysis of how risk information is used in practice in probation, prisons and courts Risk Assessment Scales • Look at likelihood of sexualism • Generic Risk Tools can be used on a general criminal population to predict recidivism • Created by John Andrews • LSI is the main one with different versions because these are copyrighted tool.  • Can be used international practice in western and non­western countries Appeal of Risk Assessments • Reliability and certainty “the taming of chance” or “colonizing the future” o They are reliable statistics and predict future outcomes based on past circumstances  • It allows for standardization, consistency and transparency (curtail discretion) o In consistency that offenders are not being trade fairly o The idea is that everyone is assessed in the same criteria o They are more transparent and see what is being evaluated  • Accountability and Defensibility o If you are a police officer and let out a risk offender in the community and how did you assess  this individual and he can state that they used this tool. o Protects institutions and probation officers o Less responsibility and criminal justice system can defend the decisions they make  Actuarial Risk in Practice  • The use of actuarial risk assessments varies across the country. • Increasingly, jurisdictions use risk assessment to inform arrest and bail decisions, to select diversion  candidates and  to structure and inform police,  parole, probation and custom officers’ decision­making.  • Since 2000, 9 of Canada’s 13 jurisdictions have adopted the use of risk assessments for the  preparation of pre­sentencing reports (PSR).    Ontario’s Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services (MCSCS) • ‘The assessment process for court ordered report (PSR) closely parallels the LSI­OR assessment  process.  It is entirely appropriate and may be very helpful if the author uses the LSI­OR as a tool to  assist with the preparation of a PSR assessment.  However, the use of the instrument and the score  must not be referenced in the report.’ Third Generation Risk Assessment Dynamic Risk / Criminogenic need • Mid 1980s, Level of Service Inventory LSI initial series of tools • Distinctive  because it purports to objectively and systematically measure static and dynamic risk or  criminogenic need factors. • Uses meta­analysis of treatment studies to established a set of  dynamic variables or ‘needs’ that  are  statistically shown to be correlated with criminal conduct,  and added items to risk  assessment tools • Data based for tools derived from adult male correctional population • Reasserts the premise that offenders can change  if knowledge of offenders’ needs was integrated  into assessment. •  Dynamic risk factors are a subset of offender ‘needs’ that statistically co­related  with  recidivism AND  amenable to intervention .  • Dynamic” risk factors are malleable and thus differ from static risk factors (like age at first arrest or  number of convictions), which are also statistically co­related with recidivism, but cannot be altered. Operationalization of Risk • Score does not  • Criminogenic factors • Risk Assessment LSI o Used by parole divisions o Medium, High risk and everything and check every factor that’s relevant and number the ticks  and you have a score o Reliable tool o All you need is 20 minutes o Sometimes there are offenders and really good ones look at collateral offenders—young  offender (parents, teachers, employers) Appeal of Actural Assessments • Structures practitioners’ decision making:  • Defensible, Accountable Decisions  o Practitioners maintain that decisions made using structured risk assessment tools were ‘more  defensible thgut feelings’,which were seen as the basis of discretionary judgments that  do not employ actuarial tools.  o One Crown Attorney noted that ‘recommendations for pre­trial detention and  sentencing were more persuasive and defensible  if you could show that the  recommendations were based on a systematic review and analysis of the areas of risk and  need shown by research to be related to recidivism’.  o Others suggested risk assessments were a ‘ matter of common sense ’” but that common  sense is not persuasive in court or in terms of the public perceptions of ‘just’ and rational  decision making .  • Standardization, consistency and transparency (curtail discretion) 1. Everyone is using the same ‘play book’ – they assess the same areas in the same way 2. It makes ‘the reasoning behind the case plan more transparent – it makes it easier tot transfer  the case’ • Less disparity  1.  More uniform and consistent decision making within particular offices, and across regions and  officers  2. Eliminates subjective judgement, arbitrariness, bias and prejudice – it “makes it all impartial” • Managerially Structures correctional resources to ensure they are efficiently used: 1. Allocates offenders to “appropriate programs based on the level of risk/need” – high risk – high  intervention 2.  Allows for a process of program accreditation and standardization – all programs must target  criminogenic needs and demonstrate impact on rates of recidivism 3. Legitimates correctional interventions which are framed as ‘evidence based’ 1. If someone is low­risk then it is really unnecessary, if you are high risk and it tells who to  direct the resources too 2.
More Less

Related notes for SOC205H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit