Class Notes (839,194)
Canada (511,223)
Sociology (4,081)
SOC231H5 (94)
Lecture

SOC231- MARX and CAPITALISM

4 Pages
169 Views

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC231H5
Professor
Zaheer Baber

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 4 pages of the document.
Description
September 30, 2013 ­ Marx looking at the world through SOCIAL STRUCTION ­ Ideas of agency  ­ Concept of social structure, we are navigating our way through these structures: it  gives us the roles we need to play in the society.  o Cannot be “felt” all at the same time: simultaneously o Individuals in this structures are constrained ­ Networking:  o i.e : in feudalism : no need for networking, since you’ll be a “servant” for  the rest of you’re life, as well as your children ­ Human agency: informed, but not compelled by the social structure ­ Universities= commodities = advertising themselves= uni/col selling education;  education becomes a product o Bill Moyers: a internationally famous journalist o Chris Hedges: a Renaissance person, journalist for NY Times, professor, not a  Marxist, however, thinks that Marx concept is necessary to understand the world.  o “sacrifice zones” o “inverted totalitarianism”: think through Marx: Feudalism­> didn’t  disappear completely, Neo­Feudalism in a global scale: horrible working  conditions  Test next week: ­ Give out the questions in advance, not an open book ­ Not be blindsided by the text, not cover in the slide, not in the text  “Commodities”▯the commodification of everything, including social relations Mature Capitalism: key features 1. crisis due to “overproduction” a. usually seen as positive b. in Capitalism : overproduction : negative ▯ causes a fall in the rates of  profits c. triggers economical crises 2. concentration of capital a. leads to a fewer concentration of capital 3. falling rate of profits: cutting the cost of production a. provide fewer wages b. same/lower pay : longer hours c. leads to the endless cycle of recessions and booms  ­ will never be resolve since it is integrated in the capitalist system Marx’s dialectical perspective: Capitalism simultaneously wonderful and a nightmare,  nor a question of simple or bad. See. Excerpts of “Communist Manifesto” 4. The Concept of Class Key defining features: Relationship to the “Means of Production” Workers own: “labour power” Capitalists own: Capital, land, industry, and land  ▯agricultural, industrial Feudalism 1. those who owns the land 2. those  Two class model: ­ Bourgeoisie ▯ those who own the means of production ­ Proletariat ▯ those who do not own the “means of production”  Mature capitalism: “Class polarization” Capitalist/ Bourgeoisie  1. industrial bourgeoisie 2. financial bourgeoisie 3. landowners petite bourgeoisie Proletariat  ­ old middle class ­ new middle class ­ the proletariat (working class) ­ Lumpen­proletariat Polarization and Homogenization of Classes ­ despite conflicts within classes ­ conflict between capitalists : “Silicon Valley” and “Hollywood”, who produce  different products but connected and affected by digital  Class Struggle and Social change ­ class in itself: “objective”, structural class position ­ class for itself : class Consciousness or “subjective” awareness of one’s class position ­ overproduction of commodities (destruction; abandones homes) for marx, Irrational/  Contradictory ­ declining rates of Profits ­ centralization of capital: mergers and takeovers “boom” and “bust” : recessions, depression ▯ endless cycle, gets wo
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit