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Lecture 10

Lecture 10 Notes

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Department
Sociology
Course
SOC307H5
Professor
David Brownfield
Semester
Winter

Description
Crime and Delinquency March 21, 2013 Two weeks ago we were focusing on subcultural theory and one of the main things about Shaw and McKay is that they found information first and then made a theory as opposed to the other way around Shaw and McKay describe social disorganization in areas with high crime rates – institutions of family, schools, religion, etc. were not effective Disorganized neighbourhoods lacked discipline over children (more reliance on police)  A high rate of migration characterizes disorganization  Shaw and McKay also believe that street gangs are more likely in these deteriorated urban disorganized areas  Subcultural basis encourage crime in disorganized neighbourhoods Criminal and delinquent traditions develop in gangs, and may be passed on to the next generation These criminal traditions may replace absence of effective conventional institutions such as the family Cohen describes similar level of “organization” in high crime rate and low crime rate areas Differential social organization concept influenced Sutherland’s theory  Implies there may be a subcultural of crime and delinquency Middle class subcultural theory influenced by research on adolescence, and increased crime among more affluent Social status of adolescents is not clearly defined (dependency, lack of economic role) Erickson recommends decriminalizing “status offences” such as underage drinking, smoking, and truancy Programs to deinstitutionalize status offenders (dso programs) – but difficult to isolate such offenders - TEST – Starting from victimization surveys Questions on correlates of victimization – age, gender, income (is income a strong predictor of victimization? It is a fairly week predictor)  Place of residence Que
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