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Lecture 8

Lecture 8

2 Pages
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Department
Visual Culture and Communication
Course Code
VCC101H5
Professor
Amish Morrell

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June 3, 2010
VCC201 Lecture 8
Public Sphere Pim Reinders, 1698, Interior of European Coffee House (IMAGE)
A term which originated with the German theorist Jürgen Habermas that defines
space where citizens come together to debate and discuss the pressing issues of their
society.
Habermas defined this as an ideal space in which well-informed citizens would
discuss matters of common public interest outside of the context of private interests.
Example of public sphere is Wellington Park, NYC meeting place for people to
come and hang out; sometimes people are performing
The public sphere is only an ideal
Michael Shamberg, Guerilla Television, Raindance Corporation, 1971 - IMAGE
Media can represent and stand in the public sphere
Politics can be integrated into the public sphere
Manual for using video, for making your own media
TVTV, Four More Years... - IMAGE
Showing how to use the camera
A way for talking back to the mainstream media outlets
Society of the Spectacle
Guy Debord (1967)
Situationist thinker
Visual representations dominate spectacles to unify and separate
Concerned with consumer images and how they dominated western culture
In societies where modern conditions of production prevail. All of life presents itself
as an immense accumulation of spectacles. Everything that was lived has moved
away into a representation.
The wealth of societies in which the capitalist mode of production prevails appears
as an immense collection of commodities
The spectacle is not a collection of images, but a social relation among people,
mediated by images.
The spectacle reunites the separate, but reunites it as separate
The spectacle is capital to such a degree of accumulation that it becomes an image
Spectacle works through Reification Richard Prince, Untitled, 1987 (IMAGE)
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Description
June 3, 2010 VCC201 Lecture 8 Public Sphere Pim Reinders, 1698, Interior of European CoffeeHouse (IMAGE) A term which originated with the German theorist Jrgen Habermas that defines space where citizens come together to debate and discuss the pressing issues of their society. Habermas defined this as an ideal space in which well-informed citizens would discuss matters of common public interest outside of the context of private interests. Example of public sphere is Wellington Park, NYC meeting place for people to come and hang out; sometimes people are performing The public sphere is only an ideal Michael Shamberg, Guerilla Television, Raindance Corporation, 1971 - IMAGE Media can represent and stand in the public sphere Politics can be integrated into the public sphere Manual for using video, for making your own media TVTV, Four More Years... - IMAGE Showing how to use the
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