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Lecture

Race and racism

2 Pages
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Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTA02H3
Professor
Maggie Cummings

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Lecture (24-03-11)
Race and racism:
There was a time when certain groups of people owned different groups of people
How does racism look like now? What are the similarities and differences?
Modes of exclusion, inferiorization, subordination, and exploitation that present specific and
different characters in different social and histor ical contexts (1992:2)
Racism is thought to be as plural because it helps us compare (ex. Race and ethnicity)
Agency versus structure:
Social identity (things that make you a unique individual), social roles determines much about
our behaviour, rights, etc (individuals tend to choose to act according to their social identity)
People in the same social identities usually make the same decisions so you are still shaped by
the group you are part of
Agency: the power of individuals to choose what to do, how to act, based on intention there must
be alternatives in order to have agency (choosing to do one thing over another)
Structure: larger forces such as political economy, institutions, ideologies, etc
Burgois on agency and structure
The crack dealers are victims of structure forces, but do not accept this passively
They struggle for respect against these forces by embracing street culture and underground
economy
BUT they become agents of their own structure and further oppression by doing so
(Crack dealers are victims of social identity and instead of accepting it they struggle for respect)
-> essay question for final exam
There are structural forces that are beyond the control of t hese men (they came from Puerto Rico
in Caribbean): people used to drop slaves and pick up commodities such as sugar (initially
conquered by Spanish till 1898 and then was conquered by /USA and still remains that way, they
are US subjects and cannot vote in elections, etc)
Habaro (people who refused to leave their farm and work for the big farm, they left and lived in
the mountain areas): too much pride to work for other people and cultural dignity
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Description
Lecture (24-03-11) Race and racism: There was a time when certain groups of people owned different groups of people How does racism look like now? What are the similarities and differences? Modes of exclusion, inferiorization, subordination, and exploitation that present specific and different characters in different social and historical contexts (1992:2) Racism is thought to be as plural because it helps us compare (ex. Race and ethnicity) Agency versus structure: Social identity (things that make you a unique individual), social roles determines much about our behaviour, rights, etc (individuals tend to choose to act according to their social identity) People in the same social identities usually make the same decisions so you are still shaped by the group you are part of Agency: the power of individuals to choose what to do, how to act, based on intention there must be alternatives in order to have agency (choosing to do one thing over another) Structure: larger forces such as political economy, institu
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