Class Notes (835,581)
Canada (509,259)
Anthropology (1,586)
ANTB14H3 (28)
Lecture 6

Lecture 6.docx

14 Pages
132 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTB14H3
Professor
Michael Schillaci
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 6/ Chapter 6 The first hominins What’s a hominin? Sub family –  always ends with the nae  Ponginae – Orangutans  Mosaic Evolution – Fossil data often shows different collections of primitive and derived  characters  Cranial and Dental morphologies:  Increase in the size of the brain and a decrease in the size of  the face and dentition.  • A phylogenetic species is one encompassing the smallest set of organisms that share a  common ancestor and can be distinguished from other such set of organisms • Hominini: tribe within the homininae comprising humans, chimpanzees, and our most  recent common ancestors Morphological trends in hominin evolution • Reviewing morphological trends in hominin evolution is important for two reasons: 1. We need to understand what features contributed to an adaptive radiation of  hominins at a time when contemporaneous fossil apes were disappearing 2. We need to understand that there is no singular feature that resulted in the  biological evolution of human beings • Mosaic evolution: the evolution at different rates of various related or unrelated features  within a lineage or clade • Bipedalism: habitual upright locomotion on two feet Cranial and dental morphologies • Robust: physically strong durable • The earliest hominins have small molars with thin enamel, larger canines • The earliest species in our genus homo evolved a large, globular cranium, a more gracile,  slight, slender, jaw and smaller teeth Increased brain size  • Increased brain size is relative to the social group. • A better measure of intelligence may lie in the number of neurons and the speed at which  they communicate • Human brain occupies 2% of our body mass, consumes about 20% of our total  metabolism • Thy hypotheses formulated by evolutionary anthropologists for increased brain size falls  into three categories: 1. Ecological: improved ability to hunt or forage food 2. Epiphenomenal: increased body size resulted in a concomitant increase in brain  size 3. Socialization: to deal with increasing complexity of social organization Bipedalism  Feature Bipedal Hominins Quadrupedal Apes Foramen magnum Located anteriorly Located posteriorly Spinal curvature Dual Singular Pelvis shape Shorter, broader Longer, narrower Femur length Longer Shorter Knee orientation Valgus (adducted) Straight Foot shape Narrower Broader Hallux (“big toe”) placement Non­opposable Opposable • Longtitunal arch – Bipeds have this • Adducted: toward the midline of the body • Three most plausible hypothesis for bipedalism: 1. Feeding posture hypothesis: early hominins were pre­adapted to an upright  posture 2. Behavioural theory: to improve the ability of males to carry food resources to  their mates and offspring 3. Thermoregulatory theory: improve heat dissipation  The knees of A. afarensis are more like the knees of modern humans than the knees  of chimpanzees. Consider the lower end of the femur, where it forms one side of the  knee joint. In chimpanzees, this joint forms a right angle with the long axis of the  femur. In humans and australopithecines, the knee joint forms an oblique angle,  causing the femur to slant inward toward the centerline of the body. This slant causes  the knee to be carried closer to the body’s centerline, which increases the efficiency  of bipedal walking. In apes the femur is very closer to 90 degrees.  BIPEDALITY The pelvis of A. afarensis resembles the modern human pelvis more than the  chimpanzee pelvis. Notice that the australopithecine pelvis is flattened and  flared like the modern human pelvis. These features increase the efficiency of  bipedal walking. The australopithecine pelvis is also much wider and narrower  than that of modern humans. Some anthropologists believe these differences  indicate that australopithecines did not walk the same way as modern humans  do. • Pelvis is longer in the chimps compared to humans.  Orientation of the pelvis is also  different in chimps compared to humans  • Length of the limb (arms) is longer in chimps than humans. A schematic diagram of the lower body at the point of the stride in which all of the weight is on  one leg. Body weight acts to pull down through the centerline of the pelvis. This creates a torque,  or twisting force, around the hip joint of the weighted leg. (a) If this torque were unopposed, the  torso would twist down and to the left. (b) During each stride the abductor muscles tighten to  create a second torque that keeps the body erect. Three different gluteus muscles ­  (your behind) Why did apes go from quadrupeds to bipeds? ( million dollar question) 3 Theories on Evoultion  1)Feeding posture –  eating leaves 2)Behaviour – avoiding predators , it allows to use tools. 3) Thermoregulation – Less solar radiation  Bipedal locomotion helps an animal living in warm climates to keep cool by reducing the amount  of sunlight that falls on the body, by increasing the animal’s exposure to air movements, and by  immersing it in lower­temperature air. Finding and estimating the age of fossil hominins • Breccia: a coarse grained rock composed of angular fragments of pre­existing rocks • Dating is critical in determining a chronological framework for the hominins • There is a strong interest in determining the oldest evidence for hominins and their  material remains • There are two categories of dating methods: relative and absolute Relative dating • Involve determining whether a fossil or the sediment it is buried in is you
More Less

Related notes for ANTB14H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit