Class Notes (834,986)
Canada (508,846)
Anthropology (1,586)
ANTB16H3 (8)
Lecture 3

Lecture 3.docx

6 Pages
86 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTB16H3
Professor
Zachariah Campbell
Semester
Winter

Description
January 20, 2014 In text citation­Instructions on her slides Previous Class: Media and National Cultures ­Talked about Benedict Anderson vs Barthes ­Tim Hortons­ presenting itself as Canadian. ­Tim Hortons presents Canadianness as being centered around these day to day  experiences of food and friends and also centered around the values of endurance.  Making our way up that hill everyday to get our coffee. TH presents itself as a home for  Canadianness as a form of travel. Cormack argues: ­Tim Hortons adds Canadianness=daily food experiences, endurance, home ­Enabled by gaps in identity projected by government, which is mainly  technological ­Mackey­The House of Difference  ­Discusses larger argument: how Canadian national identity has been  developed through a long period of history, post­ WWII. The stories we tell  about the history of Canada are part of this larger development of identity.  Anderson argues; Mass media enabled and encouraged the imagination of the country Barthes: ­Mass media gets us to by into the myths of national culture: ‘mythology; ­It is bourgeois culture but its not called bourgeois French culture but just French culture. ­Power of myth is that it makes these history and political things seem natural and  commonsense. Myth ­Meaning is made through joining little bits of the world together. The smallest unit of  meaning is ‘the sign’ it is made up of the signifier and the signified. ­Myth takes the first level of meaning and adds a second level to it. Myth Barthes argues that myth works because both it has repetitive process but also because its  grounded on this initial concrete sign and therefore these concrete way of making  meaning has a strong influence over us believing and buying into the myth. ­Grounded in the initial sign ­This process makes myths natural and common sense ­Offers an alibi for the second order **Picture of Mackey’s, to make use of her argument** ­Two people shaking hands, a photographer is a sign itself ­Unnamed Mountie and a chief sitting­eagle ­Myth level: removes particular contexts and replaces them with general concepts like  national pride. ­Mackey is making an argument about how these larger discourses of national pride in  particular and national formation are developed out of the particulars of history.  Mackey­National Identities ­She starts out with questions, people talk about the research they do in this way.­­­­­ National identity: ­Nationalist’s discourses were focused on creating homogeneity  ­Was Canadian nationalism just nicer or was it making a different kind of  instruction that was doing the same thing (managing populations, structures to retain  power) Deconstructing the Myth of Canadian Tolerance ­Myth, an idea of national culture and what it is about. ­Disconnected from the particulars of history ­Interested in how this myth has built up, where its coming from and how  people  interact with it.  ­Why study dominant mythology? ­Barthes: dominant myths are considered not cultural forms coming from  particular places in history but from history in the world. ­Deconstructing allows us to see how it’s not natural ­Mackey is interested in studying this process of dominant Canadian myths but analyzing  complex process through which such culture is a log­term project, constantly created by  the state and individuals. ­Critique: “a critique is not a matter of saying things are not right as they are. It is a  matter of pointing out on what kinds of assumptions, what kinds of familiar,  unchallenged, unconsidered modes of thought the practices we accept rest”. ­It is not just starting with saying something bad but seeing how its working and  what its doing Why Nations? ­Challenge the idea that­having a nation is an inherent attribute of humanity. ­She critiques that there needs to be a national identity, a unified national identity for a  country to survive. ­She argues that nation building and nationalism are projects, do not naturally exist ­Socially transmitted endeavors, in part about creating social things ­People involved in the project might have different ideas about the content.  ­People who are not involved might say, “do we need national identity?” **Picture of Mackey’s, to make use of her argument** ­What is the content of this idea, that Canadian cultural national identity? ­This postcard devotes mythology of Canadian identity, “benevolent Mounty myth” ­This image of collaboration between the state and nations people in the  creation of this country. Dominant Narratives ­E.g. ‘Benevolent Mountie Myth’, ’ cultural mosaic’ ­Mounties were representatives of law and created peace in less violence  ways  than in the states,  ­This myth was an important part of emerging parts of mythology Cultural Mosaic: Canada is a cultural mosaic ­Canada was different from the US because of its existence as a cultural  mosaic ­These narratives center around this national identity based on multiculturalism and  diversity. ­But: put white English Canada at the center. ­Tolerance: white people are tolerant ­Largely used to distinguish Canadianness from the US and from Britain ­Distinct national culture, like other projects of nationalism this is in part about the  management of power. Settler Nationalism ­Mackey says it’s a different kind of nationalism project, part because of the  different context. ­Canada as opposed to UK is a settler country, it was colonized (British  Canadian occupied lands and settler), therefore it has different national  myths  to create.  ­Settler colonies like Canada and Australia, we see some similar things in the  nationalism. ‘ ­Canada as settler colony draws on this idea of pluralism to draw on its  national identity. ­Seen as ‘in crisis’, threatened ­Canada was a settler colony that conquered another settler colony. ­British parts of Canada conquered French parts of Canada. (Pluralism) Pluralist identity ­As a flexible strategy for managing populations ­Two founding nations ­British and the French ­We have two founding nations and pluralism, which is everyone else. ­Immigrants are sometimes insiders and sometimes outsiders. Methods ­Multi­sited ethnography: going to number of different places and seeing how things  happening in theses places link 
More Less

Related notes for ANTB16H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit