Lecture 4

6 Pages
128 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTB16H3
Professor
Zachariah Campbell
Semester
Winter

Description
January 27, 2014 Previous class: identity is not something that happens but a project people get involved  in. ­Mackey talks about the history of Canada, used in the service of this project of national  identity ­Multiculturalism is a big key word in the stories told about Canadian National Identity ­Are these completely new or do they draw on older stories of history? Today’s class: Wilderness and National Identity ­Mackey focuses on the group of 7 as an earlier artistic movement. ­Focused on wilderness and nature as a mark of distinctiveness. ­Giving them a distinct character ­They didn’t only paint wild nature ­Painting of a home: The stories told about history are selective ­Narratives focused on their wild paintings, they are comodified more in forms of mugs *Quote by Lawren Harris  ­What national identity is about: a connection with the land a need to have a  masculinized identity Group of Seven ­Wilderness ­To create a distinct national art `­Takes settler perspective to form distinct identity: coming to the land from not having  lived here and used the land for practical purposes. ­“The land is wild, and unwelcoming.. “= Settler perspective ­Creating wilderness as something to be experienced and conquered to give a  new national identity. Multiculturalism Post WWII ­She focuses in on how during WWII, a lot of the state racism, which was under covers  (more subtle in the prewar period), actually came to the fourth during the war ­State Racism during WWII ­Internment of Japanese­Canadians ­German­Canadians, Italian­Canadians ­The state needed immigrants to settle the land but sometimes it was not so  benevolent to those migrants.  ­They were moved around and identified as outside Canadian National  Identity. ­Immigration was necessary to nation building ­E.g. 1941 pamphlet: The New Canadian Loyalists ­By John Murray Gibbons (also wrote ‘The Canadian Mosaic’) ­Focused on assimilability, it vividly illustrates the values assumed to be  characteristic of Canada and Canadians, and assumptions about how ‘new  Canadians’ were to fit into and contribute to the dominant British society and  its project of nation­building.  ­He talks about how we see migrants as being ale to be loyal to Canada, but  he is much about segmenting out this migrant diversity. ­His focuses is on how much these migrant groups can become like migrant  British Canadians, some are easy and loyal, some do not assimilate as much  as we’d like them to in particular he focuses on Ukrainians as forming more  separate communities. Post WWII ­Increased effort to create independent national identity. ­E.g. 1947 Canadian Citizenship Act  ­Before this there are many ways in which Canadian citizenship was  different from British citizenship ­Citizenships is a way in which nations manage who can work where and  who  can go where. ­Period of growth and economic prosperity ­There is a lot more need for labour, and more money to throw around ­People were needed to work in companies, farms, and factories ­government took a Keynesian approach to the management of society which  involved state support for industries in large scale, the formation of crown  corporations, scientific research, etc.  ­Needed labour power of immigrants ­Initially­efforts to maintain Northern European; government was trying to  keep Canada White British ­The state need labour more than it need to maintain its white British  hegemony, on the 1950’s opened up efforts to recruit Italians Portuguese,  Greeks. ­Government was trying to encourage migration from Britain and northern  European countries 1960’s Immigration ­Government of Canada made attempts to replace ethnicity, country of origin with skills,  training, and education. ­Late 1960’s­economic boom ­Introduced point system; this allowed in Asian and other Third World  skilled immigrants. ­Expanded beyond Europe­Asia, etc. rd ­1970s people coming from Asia and “other 3  world countries” were a big part of  migration ­Mackey argues that this change in patterns of migration, which is often described in the  kinds of national events and stories as being benevolent of Canada, it is about what was  practically needed by the state at that point and time. These changes were not about  Canada being a tolerant country. Post­war State Nationalism ­Increase in state intervention­health, welfare, and scientific research, culture ­There is a big involvement of the state in part of an effort for nation building. ­Search for ‘Canadian Identity’. ­Canadian Identity is something that government is involved in, creating an  identity different than the British Empire. ­There were lots of commissions; the government put together commissions (board of  people who talk to lots of people who put a report on recommendations). ­E.g. Fowler Commissions (mid­50s) ­Can we resist the tidal wave of American cultural activity? Can we retain a  Canadian identity, art, and culture­a Canadian nationhood?’ (quoted in  Mackey 2002:54) ­Cultural forms like radio should more than just a profitable business but  should  be unified across and the country and be an important part of  National Identity.   Commissions on Canadian Culture ­The sense of danger to Canadian culture was palpable, and increased state funding was  explicitly channeled towards developing Canadian culture to protect against US cultural  imperialism. As a result, culture and identity were the basis of four major inquiries in the two decades  after the war: ­Massey Commission (1949)­arts, letter and sciences ­Fowler Commission (1955)­tv and radio ­O’Leary Commission (1961)­ magazine publishing ­Laurendeau­Dunon (1963)­ bilingualism an biculturalism ­It was interesting in managing culture within Canada, differences within Canada  specifically Quebec’s place within Canada Quebec separatism ­New Quebec Nationalism Post­WWII ­a new form of Quebec nationalism emerged ­Separatist sentiment and the ‘Quiet Revolution’ made it clear that Quebec  would no longer accept being treated as a province like any other. ­Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson ­Developed a strategy to increased demands for independence in Quebec and  the complex demands of nationalism and identity within Canada. ­Negotiated the idea of ‘cooperative federalism’: a series of agreements  between Ottawa and the provinces that accepted the need for increased  consultation and flexibility. ­Canada as ‘equal partnership’ between French and English Canadians ­Symbolic and ritual nation building ­The flag: is a nation’s premier graphic symbol second in importance only to  the nation’s premier linguistic symbol­it’s name.  ­Centennial (hundredth anniversary)  The Flag ­The flag is a big symbol of nationalism ­Union Jack­ flag of the British Empire ­Red Ensign­British code of dreams: both Canadian code of arms and marks British  Empire. ­Used for national events ­1965 Flag ­Pearson prefers one fairly similarly to the Red Ensign without the Union  Jack,  with no tie to the British empire marking a break more firmly,  independent national  ident
More Less

Related notes for ANTB16H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit