Class Notes (836,969)
Canada (509,984)
Anthropology (1,602)
ANTB16H3 (8)
Lecture 6

Lecture 6.docx

6 Pages
66 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTB16H3
Professor
Zachariah Campbell
Semester
Winter

Description
February 10, 2014 Class #6 Test ­Multiple choice, true/false, fill­in­the­blank and short answer ­Know terms, arguments, and explain an example for everything ­Define and explain myth? Use an example, or counterpublics Previous class: ­Anarjuat had problems with funding, it had explicit funding for aboriginal Canadian  projects but was restricted within that.  ­Focused on telling a legend of the past, also focused on telling history ­LMOP: focused on telling stories of the present Today’s Class: Folklore and Festivals ­ LMOP focuses on a festival event with food, little dancing, language classes,  speeches ­ Anarjuat focuses on folklore telling previous stories, customs, etc. ­Social Action ­What are the structures of German folk tales, characters that re­appear? They’re not  interested in that but rather in the ways that folkloric festivals are social actions ­The readings focus on what folkloric does ­Cultural objectification ­Audience: meaning and action taking place ­Folk, tradition, and nationalism: these links between describing something or searching  for something of these subjects.  Mackey­Celebrating Canada ­Mackey draws on her fieldwork mostly in relatively small town festivals around the  Canada day festivals. The festivals she looked at, foregrounded white culture and ex­ nominated it (Barthe­ myth is part of ex­nominating bourgeois culture, its now called  culture. ­‘Ethnic’ culture objectified ­Often involves generalizing, this is her main argument ­She looks a different festivals in towns ­Elmford ‘Lakefront Festival’ and “national Neighborhood Party’ ­Attended mostly by white middle­class families ­Activities like strawberry socials not marked as ‘traditional Anglo­Canadian’ ­Dances of other ethnic groups often labeled ‘folkloric’ or ‘traditional’  ­Sponsored by ginger­ale ­Had events located at the lake front­ sale boat races, barbeques, dance  demonstrations ­Had a large attendance of 80k people over three days. ­It tells us that this festival named after a celebration of the local (lakefront),  is in most part focused around things that are not called white but are  generally understood to be white cultural practices. ­Federal MP’s speech focused on unity. ­This festival was a white festival, but it wasn’t named as such. ­Mackey argues is that by looking at the participation and the way in which different  things are labeled, we can see different cultural identities.  Festival (cont’d) ­Elmford: Canada Day Festival ­Organized by Elmford Multicultural Council ­Racial and ethnic mix of participants ­Celebration of Canadian citizenship and multiculturalism ­‘Culture’ as ‘color’ and as consumable ­She says there are some similarities in the way that ethnic culture is portrayed in both of  theses festivals, in this festival it was seen as consumable (as an object, a dance, a food,  and you can go around and consume different cultures). ­This festival was focused on pluralism but were different cultures were  consumable. ­The first festival was focused on local identities, that they are naturally white identities;  the second presents this idea that national, multicultural identifies are the developed  identities.  ­Rockville: Canada Flag Day, 1812 re­enactments ­White middle­class families mostly attended it ­Mackey wants to show another aspect as managing diversity, managing the presentation  of aboriginal Canadians. ­Mackey was interested in seeing if there are people that are playing the native fighters  who were involved in these battles? The part of native peoples in this kind of military  history is absent.  ­Mackey suggests this re­enactment can we be seen in two ways: reclaiming ties to a  family that has been erased by racism or a away of appropriating identities  ­Each festival presents different view about what Canadian nationalism Is about, but Its  focused is that Canadian nationalism should be celebrated. Handler­ Quebec and Folk Societies ­ Handler is interested in the case in which what is trying to be the dominant identity is  called folk. ­Folks society become the focus of nationalist development. ­Mackey is looking at Southern Ontario (English Canadian culture), Handler is interested  in the contested nationalism of Quebec,  ­French Canadians within the context of the larger state.  ­Handler is interested in the rising nationalism post­WWII and the objectification of  culture. ­He did some ethnographic (seeing things, interviews, experiencing) but  also  does analysis of policies, and various historic stories. ­The main argument is that within the context of this nationalist movement, culture as a  thing, becomes a thing. ­It becomes objectified, something you can point to.  ­Handler argues that the idea of a folk society are partly invented, the idea of tradition is  an invention. ­The idea that the gigue is a traditional dance and the other dances are not is  in fact the invented tradition. The choosing of one practice as tradition and  leaving behind other things as non­traditional is the invention. ­Part of the invention of tradition, was that there was a stable society at one point where  things didn’t change and now it has changed, so lets go back and find the practices of that  stabled society.  Vacance­Familes ­The idea is that is that this is intended to connect Quebequoi with their roots.  ­Handler argues that this was part of the institutions that were objectifying rural folk  culture.  ­While the visitors were supposed to be experiencing their roots, it was also changing the  lives of the host families: ­1. Economically: tourism was becoming a business for them. Sometimes it  brought in more income than farming. ­2. View of own practices: changed the perspective of their practices, they began  to see them from a distance. Began to see the things they were used to  doing, like  having certain kinds of parties as something that was a tourist  attraction.  Lauriers and the Gigue ­How do we see these changes of the economic structures and also folk practices,  understood by those doing them.  ­The Lauriers are a farm family in Beauce County, south of the Quebec City ­Reveillon­party after Midnight Mass: go to mass at midnight on Christmas eve and then  you have a party. ­Composed of the extended family plus guests ­Dancing, playing cards ­He talks about Mr. Laurier playing his harmonica and couples dancing. ­Individual dancers did the gigue ­It is in the proce
More Less

Related notes for ANTB16H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit