Class Notes (835,340)
Canada (509,114)
Anthropology (1,586)
ANTC16H3 (7)
Lecture 6

ANTC16 - Lecture 6.docx

9 Pages
69 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTC16H3
Professor
Safieh Moghaddam
Semester
Winter

Description
ANTC16 – Lecture 6  Life history might be defined as the allocation of an organism’s energy toward maintenance, reproduction,  raising offspring to independence, and avoiding death. For a mammal, it is the strategy of when to be born,  when to be weaned, when to stop growing, when to reproduce, and when to die – Smith and Tompkins (1995)  Life history matters because it is central to natural selection and it impacts many other aspects of life (key  component of scenarios about the process of human evolution)  Humans have a long period of infant dependency  Owen Lovejoy hypothesizes that males must travel long distances with females who have needy offspring  Human life history consists of: Long gestation – babies are in utero for a long period of time   Large neonates – large babies  Few young – usually one child at a time  Helpless young  High rate of postnatal brain growth – brain growth continues for a year after birth  Extended period of offspring dependency  Slow growth (until spurt)  Early weaning – most animals wean until their first molar erupts but human weaning ends before then Long life – live longer than most animal  Menopause – humans stop reproducing for a long period of time before they die  There are two strategies  ­ R­selected individuals live fast and die young – typically reach maturation early, and have many  offspring with little invested in each (example: weeds or rats). They are successful in changing  environments.  ­ K­selected (carrying capacity) individuals live slow and die old – typically reach maturation late, and  have few offspring with a lot invested in each. Humans are the ultimate K­selected species. K­selected  species have a harder time adapting to changes in environment (Orangutan)  Precocial: advanced or more developed at birth relative to later maturity  Altricial: less advanced or undeveloped relative to the state at maturity  Secondarily altricial: evolved altriciality from a preccial ancestry  ▯retains large neonate size, but offspring are  helpless Unique and unexpected characteristics of human life history  Secondarily altricial offspring  Prolongation of early phases of growth  Very long lifespan, match with early cessation of female reproduction (menopause) – this is quite odd, it doesn’t  occur in many animals.  When did hominins become secondarily altricial?  Critical measure of altriciality is the size of the newborn brain relative to the adult brain  Human’s need rotations to get the baby out therefore we can use brain size to assess life history patterns  Macaque infants have 2/3rds of the brain size of an adult macaque (66%) Chimpanzee infants half slightly less than a half of an adult’s brain size (40%)  Human infants have 1/4  of the brain size of an adult human (28%)  ANTC16 – Lecture 6  Humans have very under­developed brains at birth, need to extend the period of rapid brain growth postnatally  to catch up  However there are no neonatal fossil bones that can be used – most are fragmented  The size of the pelvis is related to the size of the baby’s head (in humans not chimps) therefore this can be used  to assess infant brain size.  -in humans (but not chimps) pelvic outlet size is veryrth (the baby is small in size)  Therefore for humans the pelvic outlet is analyzed relative to adult cranial capacity  closely related to brain size chimp human Tague and Lovejoy, 1986: modified from fig. 3 ANTC16 – Lecture 6  Australopithecus, Homo erectus and Neandertals are used to assess why humans are secondarily altricial A.afarenses was not secondarily altricial  The shape of A.afaraenses’ pelvis allows the baby to be pumped out sideways They gave birth to bigger headed babies (in relation to adult brain size) (larger percent) ANTC16 – Lecture 6  Nariokotome body is a sub adult male There was a Homo erectus female pelvis was found in Gona, Ethiopia in. Assessment of the pelvis suggested  that Homo erectus infants had 34 ­36% of the adult brain size (humans were 28% and chimps were 40%), this  means that they were most likely not as helpless as humans. They had smaller headed babies than adults, the  shape of the pelvis is distinct. Do show signs of being secondarily altricial.   Reconstruction of Tabun Neandertal pelvis: it is similar in shape to humans’ pelvis, they may have given birth to the infants sideways –  different birth process They are secondarily altricial  Secondarily altricial offspring ­ intermediate is found in Homo erectus, had evolved by neandertals  ANTC16 – Lecture 6  When did hominins develop prolonged early growth?  Dental eruption and development as a proxy for overall development  A greater sample size of teeth are available and they are tied closely to distinctive developmental phases This chart shows that the first molar emerges at around 3 years in chimps and 6 years in humans  Tooth development  Ameloblasts and odotoblasts deposit enamel (outside) and dentine (inside), respectively.  Enamel is made by ameloblasts and dentin is made by odontoblasts These cells function from the dentinenamel junction and have circadian rhythm (activity varies throughout the  day)  Due to the circadian rhythm of cell activity, cross striations are left on the enamel (daily increments) – can be  used as a timeline  The enamel patterns consist of cross­striations (daily) along the enamel prism 
More Less

Related notes for ANTC16H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit