Class Notes (836,135)
Canada (509,645)
Anthropology (1,586)
ANTC16H3 (7)
Lecture 3

ANTC16 lecture 3.docx

6 Pages
88 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTC16H3
Professor
Safieh Moghaddam
Semester
Winter

Description
ANTC16 ­ Lecture 3 bipedalism There are four contenders for the earliest hominin: Sahelanthropus tchadensis ~ 6 – 7 mya  Orrorin tugenensis ~ 5.7 – 6.0 mya  Ardipithecus kadabba ~ 5.8 – 5.2 mya  Ardipithecus ramidus  ~ 4.4 mya  A hominin trait is bipedalism (walk upright)  Chips mode of locomotion is knuckle­walking (form of quadrupedal walking)  There are seven parts of a skeleton, which can indicate whether a  species is bipedal, these differences are usually identified when  comparing the modern human skeleton to that of a chimpanzee or  another great ape.  Feature 1: foramen magnum is positioned centrally Feature 2: narrow rib cage  Feature 3: multiple curves of the spine  Feature 4: pelvis­ short ilia which are broad and face laterally Feature 5: longer legs  Feature 6: modified hindlimbs  Feature 7: features of the big toe   Feature 1: position of the foramen magnum The foramen magnum of a wolf is positioned very posteriorly. The human foramen magnum is  positioned more anteriorly (near the center of the skull). The positioning of the chimp’s foramen  magnum shows an intermediate of the wolf and human. ANTC16 ­ Lecture 3 bipedalism       The skull of Sahelanthropus tchadensis (nick­named, Toumai) was reconstructed therefore it is  hard to tell for certain but based on the reconstruction the foramen magnum it shows a position  between that of a chimp and a human.  The angle of the face and the base of the occipital bone in humans is larger than 90° while in  chimps the angle is less than 90°. Sahelanthropus tchadensis is about 90° (intermediate between  the two).  Zollikofer et al., 2005   Feature 2: ribcage shape ofer et al., 2005 The human rib cage has a barrel shape and at tucks in at the end. The ape ribcage is cone shaped  and flares out near the end. The change or difference in rib shape may be associated with the  pelvis, however this is uncertain. The ape ribcage is structured in a way, which allows shoulders  to be placed more centrally to the body, and it is thought that this feature helps with climbing.  ANTC16 ­ Lecture 3 bipedalism Feature 3: spine curvature  The thoracic and sacral regions concave anteriorly (blue), this is seen  in humans and apes The cervical and lumbar regions convex anteriorly (red), these  curvatures are unique to humans.  Apes have a single curve while humans have multiple curvatures of the  spine.  The cervical vertebrae are used to hold the head up. The spinal  curvature affects the center of gravity.  Humans are well balanced when they are upright wile apes’ center of  gravity is more anterior therefore apes have a higher tendency to fall  forward. Based on spinal curvature humans are more likely to fall  backwards but the Iliofemoral ligament prevents this from happening  (by tightening)  Iliofemoral ligament ANTC16 ­ Lecture 3 bipedalism Feature 4: pelvis shape    The human ilia are short, broad and face laterally.  The pelvis of the great ape is longer and narrower than that seen in humans. The ilium in great  apes is positioned anterior/posteriorly. On the other hand the human pelvis is bowl shaped  (shorter and wider), the ilium is positioned medial/laterally. The short pelvis lowers the center of  gravity (increases stability). Muscles can only shorten (causes contraction). Muscles that pass  behind the hip cause the extension of the leg. Muscles, which are located lateral of the hip, are  abductors. The lesser abductors are located beside the joint and it plays an important role in  movement. When the foot is planted it moves the pelvis over that leg, in humans muscles are  used to counter it (lesser gluteals stabilizes the body). Chimpanzees do not have this trait. The  extension of the leg is important for climbing. To revis
More Less

Related notes for ANTC16H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit