Class Notes (834,991)
Canada (508,850)
Anthropology (1,586)
ANTC16H3 (7)
Lecture 4

ANTC16 - Lecture 4.docx

7 Pages
112 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTC16H3
Professor
Safieh Moghaddam
Semester
Winter

Description
ANTC16 – Lecture 4 Carl Linnaeus (swedish) – He was a botanist and a natural theologian who created a taxonomic classification  system and classified animals in his book systema naturae. Linnean hierarchy consists of kingdom, phylum,  class, order, family, genus, and species.  Linnean hierarchy of humans  Kingdon – Animalia  Phylum – Chordata  Class – Mammalia  Order – Primates Family – Hominidae  Genus – Homo  Species – Homo sapiens  Binomial (containing 2 names) Species contain genus and trivial name Species name contains some info about how that animal is supposed to be related to other things. Can easily change if ideas of relationships change.  Movement for uninominal species names.  The genus and species must by italicized  LCZN provides the rules for classifying animals it states that once someone names a species it cannot be  renamed  The formal name for human is: Homo sapiens Carl Linneus 1758  The LCZN also controls the format of the group (example: all family names must end in – idea)  There are two problems with taxonomy  1. How to identify species  2. How to recognize and designate groups of species (higher level taxonomy)  How to identify species  There are 20 competing definitions for species. The biological species concept (BSC) was written by Ernst  Mayr and it states ‘species are groups of actually or potentially interbreeding natural populations,  reproductively isolated from other such groups’  The reason this makes sense is b/c if you have 2 groups that continue to interbreed, they’re not going to become  different. When we do any type of analysis where we treat species as distinctive things, we’re assuming they can’t  interbreed b/c otherwise, any similarities between them could just be a product of interbreeding and not  common ancestry. Fundamentally whether or not we are components of BSC, most biologist behave as  though this is true.  This is difficult to apply this species concept to fossils because - We can’t tell reproductive patterns  - The concept doesn’t account for temporal differences  One of the ways that we can tell the reproductive patterns of a fossil is by considering some morphological  criterion but even modern species differ in how much variability they include (example: some species are  sexually dimorphic while others aren’t) ANTC16 – Lecture 4 Ideally you would like to find fossil species that would be comparable to modern species b/c otherwise when  you do an analysis with e.g.Ppan paniscus and Homo habilis, you want those to be as equivalent as possible  in terms of what they mean. So what we would like to do is use the variation we see in good modern  biological species to constrain how much variation should be in the fossil species.  Varying levels of sexual dimorphism  Sexual dimorphism is related to the intensity of male­male competition within a species  - Gibbons are similar in body size (6kg) and both sexes have large canines  - Gorillas are very sexually dimorphic (males can be twice as large as females) they are also dimorphic in  canine size.  - Chimpanzees are slightly sexually dimorphic: they have slight differences in size and they show canine  sexual dimorphism  - Mandrills have high levels of sexual dimorphism (colour, size and canine)  - Lemurs have low levels of sexual dimorphism  Humans also show some levels of sexual dimorphism: an average male weight is about 86.6 kg while average  female weight is about 74.4 kg. We are more dimorphic than chimpanzees but humans don’t show canine  sexual dimorphism.  Fossil primates  some species of fossil primates were more sexually dimorphic than any living species  Lufengpithecus is an extinct ape, which is placed in the same subfamily as orangutans (Ponginae). This species  is sexually dimorphic. In this species male have a sagittal crest while females don’t. Males also weigh two  and a half times more than females (male orangutans are 2.2 times larger than females).  Using modern primates as the basis for recognizing species in the fossil record can be possible but it can be  problematic if there are no good modern species that exists for comparison.  Why should we assume that modern primates provide the limits for what is realistic for a species? Most  primates are extinct  99% of the life that has been on earth is extinct, and we know that primates get larger  than any living primates in terms of body size s/a Gigantopithecus which was bigger than any living primates  so why shouldn’t there be more variability in the past?  ANTC16 – Lecture 4 “Hybrids” Olive baboon Yellow baboon   Ackerman et al., 2006: fig. 3 Looking at the record of Early Homo, they both come from the same time and place (H. rudolfensis and H.  habilis craniums). If you apply a gorilla model, you could argue the amount of size variation in a single  species but that implies that 1) our ancestors were much more dimorphic than us and had fundamentally  different social structures 2) the pattern of variation in other things in size were different in the past b/c this  supposed female has much larger brow ridges than the supposed male. It’s not just a semantic issue b/c it  does influence how we think about our evolutionary past  if they are two separate species that means that  they would have been competing and only one of which could be our ancestor whereas if it was one species  then that means it would have been very different from us in terms of its presumed pattern of social behvr  so it does actually matter in terms of understanding our past.  Homo rudolfensis and Homo habilis are found around the same place (geographically) and at around the same  time (temporally) – baboons can be used as models There are two species of baboons, which live in Africa: Olive baboon and the Yellow baboon. Both of these  species look different from one another but they have been known to interbreed and produce hybrid  offspring, which are larger, reproductively capable and have a greater number of teeth Our ancestors (Homo sapiens neanderthalnesis) were very different from humans today. An odd trait is that  females exhibited larger brow ridges than males (this is problematic and hasn’t been solved yet) Homo sapiens were capable and have bred with Homo neaderthalnesis but the hybrids are hard to distinguish.  They may look like either or.  ANTC16
More Less

Related notes for ANTC16H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit