Class Notes (837,548)
Canada (510,312)
BIOB12H3 (30)
Lecture

BIOB12H3S-2014-PDF#7.pdf

12 Pages
66 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biological Sciences
Course
BIOB12H3
Professor
Aarti Ashok
Semester
Winter

Description
BIOB12H3S:  Cell  &  Molecular  Biology  Laboratory       Biochemistry  module  (PDF  #7)     Introduction  to  biochemical  techniques     The  techniques  of  biochemistry  are  used  to  purify  and  characterize  various  types  of   small  molecules  and  macromolecules,  and  to  put  the  properties  of  these  molecules   into  a  biological  context.    This  might  be  equated  with  how  the  structure  and   chemical  properties  of  a  molecule  determine  its  structure  and  function  in  a  living   cell.  The  macromolecules  include  proteins,  nucleic  acids,  sugars,  fats  and  other   cellular  components.    Because  of  the  differences  in  size,  composition,  solubility  in   water,  and  other  physical  and  chemical  parameters,  different  approaches  are  taken   to  study  these  groups,  and  different  techniques  and  instruments  are  used  in   experiments.       In  nearly  all  cases  involving  multicellular  organisms,  one  of  the  first  steps  is  to   secure  the  tissue  or  cell  type  of  interest.    If  one  was  interested  in  studying  the  basic   cellular  process  of  meiosis,  floral  buds  might  be  the  starting  material  from  plants,   while  the  testes  could  be  the  starting  material  from  animals.  Having  secured  enough   starting  material,  the  next  step  is  to  lyse  the  cells  under  conditions  that  will  preserve   the  desired  structures  and/or  the  activities  of  the  desired  enzymes  or  other   macromolecules.  Usually  this  is  performed  by  using  a  detergent,  but  this  may  also  be   coupled  with  enzymatic  lysis,  physical  methods  like  grinding  in  sand  or  a  blender,   sonication,  or  passing  the  cells  through  a  small  hole  under  high  pressure.  Once  the   cells  are  broken  open,  the  resulting  suspension  is  termed  a  homogenate.     Depending  on  the  component  that  you  are  interested  in  purifying,  you  may  include  a   variety  of  metabolites  or  reagents  in  your  lysis  buffer  to  preserve  structure  and   function.  If  you  are  only  interested  in  looking  at  the  total  protein  population  by   SDS-­polyacrylamide  gel  electrophoresis  you  may  choose  to  lyse  the  cells  and   denature  the  proteins  in  one  step  (this  is  what  you  will  be  doing  in  this   laboratory).     Once  the  cells  are  broken  open,  in  many  cases  subcellular  fractionation  is   undertaken.  This  usually  centers  on  differential  centrifugation  to  sediment   subcellular  components  that  differ  in  their  size  and  density.  Centrifugation   generates  a  liquid  fraction  (the  supernatant),  and  a  solid  or  particulate  fraction   (the  pellet).  Subcellular  fractionation  is  always  coupled  with  either  a  marker   enzyme  assay  and/or  a  functional  assay  for  the  molecule  of  interest.  Marker   enzyme  assays  are  used  to  screen  for  the  presence  of  a  specific  component  in  the   various  fractions  and  is  based  upon  knowing  that  a  positive  test  for  that  marker  will   identify  those  fractions  that  contain  a  specific  subcellular  fraction  or  organelle  (for   example  a  positive  test  for  the  enzyme  cytochrome  oxidase  indicates  that  the   fraction  contains  mitochondria).    The  functional  assay  is  generally  devised  by  the   1 investigator  to  screen  for  the  presence  of  the  component  of  interest.  Obviously,  in   order  to  devise  a  test,  one  must  know  something  about  the  properties  and/or   function  of  the  molecule.  An  example  of  a  functional  assay  would  be  to  test  the   ability  of  an  inhibitor  to  alter  enzyme  activity.  The  β-­‐galactosidase  study  you  carried   out  last  laboratory  is  another  example  of  a  functional  assay.   For  the  purification  of  proteins,  the  supernatant  and/or  pellet  fractions  of  interest   are  subjected  to  the  techniques  of  protein  chemistry  in  order  to  begin  to  fractionate   the  many  proteins  found  in  the  starting  material.  These  techniques  are  diverse,  but   most  rely  on  physiochemical  properties  of  the  proteins.  These  include  the  solubility   of  proteins  in  organic  solvents  and  concentrated  salt  solutions,  and  adsorption  to   particular  materials.  Chromatography  methods  are  nearly  always  required.  These   include  ion  exchange,  gel  filtration,  and  affinity  chromatography.    Electrophoresis   is  employed  quite  often,  and  certainly  at  the  end  of  the  purification  to  determine  the   number  of  polypeptides  in  the  active  fractions.  Specifically,  Sodium  dodecyl  sulfate   (SDS)-­‐polyacrylamide  gel  electrophoresis  (PAGE)  can  be  used  to  determine  the   molecular  weight  of  protein  subunits.     In  this  Biochemistry  module  you  will  use  the  same  three  strains  used  in  Lab  6A.   Each  pair  will  be  assigned  one  of  three  E.coli  strains,  wild  type,  lacI  mutant  or  LacZ   mutant.    You  will  not  be  told  which  strain  you  have  been  given.  Each  pair  will  induce   one  sample  with  IPTG  and  leave  the  other  uninduced.  You  will  lyse  the  cells,  prepare   the  proteins  for  SDS-­‐PAGE.  The  proteins  from  the  uninduced  and  induced  cells  will   be  separated  on  a  10%  SDS-­‐polyacrylamide  gel  and  you  will  compare  the  protein   expression  profiles.  In  addition  you  will  use  an  in-­vivo  β-­galactosidase  assay  using   IPTG  and  X-­‐gal  to  look  for  enzyme  activity  in  your  cells.       2 LAB  8B:  Growth  &  Induction  of  cells  with  IPTG  and  preparation  of  a   homogenate     (per  pair  of  students)     Materials  needed  per  pair       E.coli  cells  at  an  OD 600  of  0.8-­‐0.9  in  5  mls  of  M9-­‐glycerol  medium.   M9  medium   IPTG   Microfuge  tubes   Microcentrifuge   SDS  sample  buffer  containing  SDS,  B-­‐mercaptoethanol,  glycerol  and  Brompohenol   blue  (tracking  dye)  in  a  Tris  buffer  at  pH  6.8   Heating  block       1. Take  two  3  ml  samples  of  the  unknown  E.coli  strain  assigned  (strain  1,  2  or   3).    Add  one  ml  of  M9  medium.    Label  one  tube  uninduced  and  the  other   induced.  Make  sure  you  name  is  on  the  tubes     2. Place  the  two  samples  in  the  37°C  water  bath  and  allow  the  cells  to  grow   while  shaking  for  40  minutes.     3. Remove  the  tube  labeled  induced  from  the  water  bath  and  add  500μl  of  IPTG   to  this  tube.     4. Return  the  tube  to  the  37°C  water  bath     5.  Incubate  the  cells  at  37°C  for  60-­‐70  minutes  (allows  cells  to  continue  to  grow   and  the  one  culture  to  be  induced  to  express  the  Lac  operon)     6.  Remove  both  tubes  of  cells  from  the  water  bath     7. Label  two  1.5  ml  microfuge  tubes  with  your  initials  and  the  label  “uninduced”   or  “induced”     8. Gently  mix  the  culture  tubes  taken  from  the  water  bath  and  remove  1.5ml  of   culture  into  the  appropriately  labeled  microfuge  tubes     9. Place  the  two  microfuge  tubes  containing  the  cells  into  the  microcentrifuge   with  other  members  of  your  laboratory.  Make  sure  the  centrifuge  is  balanced   (have  the  TA  check!)     10.Set  the  centrifuge  to  5000  rpm  and  the  time  for  5  min.       3 11.    When  centrifugation  is  complete,  pour  off  the  supernatant  into  the   appropriate  discard  container  for  bacterial  waste.  Make  sure  you  do  not   disturb  the  pellet  when  decanting  the  supernatant.     12.Add  another  1.5  ml  of  the  appropriate  bacterial  culture  to  the  pellet  (after   this  step  you  will  have  spun  down  a  total  of  3  ml  of  culture)  and  repeat   steps  10  and  11     13.To  each  of  the  two  pellets  (induced  and  uninduced)    add  60  μl  of  SDS  sample   Buffer  containing  bromophenol  blue.  Mix  to  resuspend  the  cells.  The  SDS,   which  is  an  anionic  detergent,  will  lyse  the  cells  and  coat  the  proteins.  The   solution  should  clear.  The  role  of  the  SDS  sample  buffer  is  discussed  further   in  Lab  9A.       14.Place  your  two  samples  into  the  heating  block  set  at  100°C  and  incubate  for  5   minutes.  This  will  aid  in  the  lysis  of  the  cells  and  denature  the  proteins.       15.At  this  point,  your  proteins  are  ready  for  loading  onto  the  SDS-­‐ polyacrylamide  gels.  Store  the  samples  in  the  rack  provided.    The  samples   will  be  place  at  -­‐20°C  until  the  next  lab.  In  Lab  9A,  you  will  perform  SDS-­‐ PAGE.       4 LAB  9A:  SDS-­PAGE  (Sodium  dodecyl  sulfate-­Polyacrylamide  Gel   Electrophoresis)  &  plating  on  X-­gal  plates       In  most  research  labs,  SDS  polyacrylamide  gel  electrophoresis  is  a  technique  central   to  many  experiments  in  cell  and  molecular  biology,  and  is  employed  to  examine   protein  profiles.  This  can  be  accomplished  by  running  the  gel  and  staining  it  with  a   non-­‐specific  stain  like  Coomassie  Brilliant  Blue.  Alternatively,  the  samples  may  be   radiolabeled  and  after  electrophoresis,  autoradiography  can  be  employed  to   examine  the  radiolabeled  components.    Finally,  in  many  instances  where  complex   mixtures  of  proteins  exist  (nearly  always  the  case!),  after  electrophoresis  the   proteins  are  transferred  to  a  solid  support  and  immunoblotting  with  a  specific   antibody  is  undertaken  to  screen  for  the  presence  of  a  specific  molecule  or  family  of   molecules.         Most  research  labs  make  their  own  gels.  This  has  three  disadvantages  in  an   undergraduate  lab.  First,  the  gel  mold  must  be  precisely  made  and  the  gel  must  be   cast  correctly  or  it  will  leak  out  of  the  mold.  Second,  the  acrylamide  monomer  is  a   potent  neurotoxin  and  great  care  must  be  exercised  in  handling  it.  Third,  it  takes   several  hours  to  prepare  a  gel,  time  which  we  don’t  have.  Thus  we  will  use   commercially  available,  precast  gels  from  a  company  called  Novex.       Procedure :     We  will  use  the  Novex  electrophoresis  modules  and  Novex  precast  gels.  The  SDS-­‐ gels  were  made  to  contain  a  final  concentration  of  10%  acrylamide.  Below  are  some   diagrams  of  how  to  assemble  the  gel  in  the  apparatus,  though  your  TA  will  likely   guide  you  through  it.         There  are  a  few  things  to  keep  in  mind.   1. Be  sure  to  wear  gloves  when  handling  the  gel.   2. Hold  the  gel  by  the  sides  only  (i.e.,  along  the  edges,  not  on  the  flat   surface).   3. You  must  take  the  gel  out  of  its  plastic  pouch,  peel  the  tape  off  the  bottom,   and  in  one  quick  motion,  take  the  comb  out  of  the  cassette.   4. Now  you  must  work  fairly  quickly  to  assemble  the  apparatus,  and  flood   the  wells  with  buffer  (so  the  gel  doesn’t  dry  around  the  wells  leading  to   cracking  and  possibly  the  mixing  of  adjacent  samples).     5. Have  about  1  liter  of  1X  running  buffer  ready  (see  below).     Running  buffer:  We  have  prepared  the  running  buffer  for  you  as  a  10X  stock.    It  is   located  on  the  side  bench  and  is  labeled  10X  SDS  PAGE  buffer.    The  formula  for  1X  is   25mM  Tris,  192mM  glycine,  1%  SDS.  To  make  1  liter,  simply  put  100ml  of  the  10X   stock  into  a  1  liter  graduate  cylinder  and  introdu
More Less

Related notes for BIOB12H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit