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Lecture 4

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Department
Biological Sciences
Course
BIOB50H3
Professor
Marc Cadotte
Semester
Winter

Description
Ecology lecture 4: - From each different block, 10 percent of the energy gets transferred – so lose 90 percent, therefore energy distribution is very inefficient - Autotrophs are the base of how energy gets fixed in our system - Chemosynthesis: taking inorganic chemicals and change them to organic compounds which we can get energy from - At the bottom of the ocean, there are vents that spew material from the earth and spit out elements like sulfur – there are special types of organisms that obtain energy from the bonds of the sulfur inorganic molecules - think about drawing an ecological system when your studying - Tansley was the first person to draw an ecological system – how are the related and how do they interact - How much they grow is determined by the amount of carbon produced - Higher temperature places tend to have higher gpp - Leaf area of 1 is 100 percent ground coverage, 12 means the ground has been covered 100 percent 12 times - Very hard to measure GPP; easier to measure NPP - Low NPP desert and artic regions; high NPP tropical regions - In order to make accurate predictions about carbon in atmosphere and climate change, must know how much carbon is being made underground and how it is made - Grasslands have extensive root systems which is why a lot of carbon is stored below ground in grasslands - Use satelites to measure chlorophyll concentrations – NDVI - It’s the ratio between the two types of light - Helps us understand how things change over time if you take same measures in same place at diff time – eg. Winter vs spring, habitat change - Primary production in water systems are not determined by carbon production because not many plants in the ocean, but it is determined by p
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