Class Notes (836,148)
Canada (509,657)
BIOD29H3 (15)
Lecture 4

BIOD29 Lecture 4 Wednesday January 15.doc

7 Pages
103 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biological Sciences
Course
BIOD29H3
Professor
Aarti Ashok
Semester
Winter

Description
BIOD29 Lecture 4                Wednesday January 15,  2014  Coronaviruses: Entry into Cells □ SARS is a subsection of group II □ Each have a mechanism – tropism dictated by a receptor based on grouping □ Group II – Polio □ L­SIGN, allow viruses to hitch a ride on immune cells  Coronaviruses: Entry into the Cells □ End product is nucleopcapsid is delivered to the cytosol  □ Transcription  subgenomic RNA □ Those mRNAase that translate into proteins □ Each template has to have the leader sequence (black box); conserved on both  ends □ TRS – possibility for RNA polymerase to terminate   Coronaviruses: Assembly of Virions □ Newly replicated genome will be dragged out to ER  transported to golgi □ S protein, transmembrane protein is expressed within virally infected cell (like  any host encoded protein, synthesized in ER, secreted through to golgi to  plasma membrane and then released  Diagram  Coronaviruses: Their adaptability □ They are good at changing themselves and effectively creating new forms of  themselves □ Subtle mutation is sufficient □ Bind to and use conserved proteins to enter the host cell – can find a similar  conserved protein if you modify the S protein Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Virus  Newsweek: SARS □ Age of complete paranoia in many different countries □ Mask wearing became the face of SARS during the global epidemic; minimal  protection (useless symbol)  SARS: A global epidemic of a newly emerged infectious disease □ Looks a lot like the regular flu, pneumonia and death rates were not indicated  of a new pathogen but a new case of the flu  □ Alerted WHO of a devastating illness that could spread quickly – helped  diagnosed □ Start of people bringing this to other parts of the world; did not have  symptoms until they reached their destination  SARS: A global epidemic □ Uncontrollable high fever and pneumonia □ Healthy 20­30 year olds got succumbed to this pneumonia  fatality rather  than the old or the young  SARS: The first Alert □ Paid with life for discovery  SARS: impact on travel, commerce, & governments □ Quarantine had to be very strict □ Other patients who would be immunocompromised  SARS: The role of WHO □ Etiological agent of this condition  □ Serum – blood without the cells, contains antibodies against coronabodies – inhibits viral growth □ Able to use a few animal models – most effective and closely resembles  human infection  Ferrets  Research Articles □ Giant author list □ 3 page paper that show they identified a novel coronavirus -  Diagram □ SARS does not fit into the groupings (they are arbitrary) □ Places SARS between Group II and III  Table  □ Always go back and refer to primary literature that is publish on the topic  SARS­CoV: Where did it come from? □ Could identify a similar strain in some of these animalsmaybe Palm civets are  just harbouring this virus and transferring it to humans, maybe when they are  moving from the farm to the wet market, maybe there is an infection on the  way  mystery organism? BATS  SARS­CoV: where did it come form?  □ SIMILAR strain not the exact same strain, does not use ACE2 (although the  bats have ACE2) □ Could easily create a new strain  SARS­CoV: where did it come from? □ Line of transmission □ Final stage is the most scary­ hard to control □ Suppress immune components in humans  SARS­CoV: Virion Structure  SARS­CoV: Receptors that allow entry  □ Several reports that there is not an increased level of ACE2 in the intestines  Figure 1: □ ACE2 acts in this renin­angiotensin system (cardiac, but with pulmonary  instances) □ ACE2 does something to angiotensin to make something else  - Do not have a good idea of what ACE2 actually do in our cells - Knockout mice – fine, but some problems with vasodilation □ ACE inhibitor – where the ace inhibitor binds and where SARS­CoV binds is  totally different  Structure of SARS Coronavirus Spike Receptor­Binding Domain Complex □ 3 ,modified slightly 27:20  Nature □ Bat virus they can isolate that does use the ACE2 receptor □ Natural reservoir, drawing from them for species transmission  L­SIGN receptor for SARS­CoV □ Thought to be the source that we can infect and bind immune cells (B and T  cells; good at moving around) – could be away to transport virions   dissemination of the virus into the CNS (encephalitis)   SARS: The pathology □ Receptors are deep into the tissue (need a big dose of the virus to travel down  to the cells) □ Part of immunopathology that is characteristic to SARS □ Droplet transmission, oral fecal transmission □ Pathological cycle of how SARS infects  SARS­CoV: Life Cycle □ Translation – discontinuous transcription □ Need budding to get infectious…32:15  Diagram □ Replicase section, disputed   Previous Studies of Relevance  □ Lysosomotropic drugs – neutralize acidity (take identity away of acidic  lysosomes) □ Used HIV system to study SARS; psuedotype, a virus that looks like  something else except what’s on its outside (only way envelop proteins can  interact is dictated by how S protein function), on the inside is HIV □ HIV (S)  Bafilomycin A1 37:58 □ A – treatment with Baf  (dip down to almost nothing) □ C­ another drug, ammonium chloride (l
More Less

Related notes for BIOD29H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit