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Lecture 9

Lecture 9

2 Pages
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Department
Environmental Science
Course Code
EESA09H3
Professor
Tanzina Mohsin

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Lecture 9: Wind and Pollution
Long range transport of pollutants in the Arctic
What are they?
Arctic haze
oBecause Arctic haze is kind of unexpected
oThere is there is snow all year round, not expected, because there is no factories, industries
oFirst noted by pilots, who saw a haze over Arctic, mainly dominant in the winter
oThe pooling is the main cause
oConstituents
Mainly sulphate, 10-20 times larger, compared to Toronto, other cities
The sulphate fix with unconbusted carbon and they block the sunlight and a haze
appears
90% sulphate, rest is carbon
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
How did they get there? Why they pool in Arctic
In Arctic not much precipitation
Need condensation for precipitation to form
Arctic has a very stable atmosphere, not much changing other than sunlight that sometimes
melt the snow
Circumpolar circulation
oPrevents all warm water from other parts of ocean to mix with cold parts of Arctic
oKeeping Arctic very cold so all ice and icebergs remain intact- no changes going on im terms
of circumpolar circulation
oOcean current prevents mixing
Eurasia
oCoal burning plants located further north
Arctic Haze
In summer, sulphate concentration is stable
In winter, concentration increases are goes with height
Impacts
New pollutant came in
Pollutants are within the environment, but cant do anything about it
Preventive methods are used in city zones, but not in the polar zones because they think nothing
will happen there and they are safe
Remediation
Hydrophobic & Lipophilic: Doesnt bond with water, bonds with fatty tissues in body
Bioaccumulation & biomagnification: as pollutant goes higher up in chain, the concentration is
getting higher
Persistent organic Pollutants
PCBS
Sometimes some of smog we breath in may contain PCB
DTT
Highly toxic
Chlordane
Can still be found in Arctic haze
How is it transported?
Chemistry
oAir-borne
oAs it travels forward, goes through condensation
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Description
Lecture 9: Wind and Pollution Long range transport of pollutants in the Arctic What are they? Arctic haze o Because Arctic haze is kind of unexpected o There is there is snow all year round, not expected, because there is no factories, industries o First noted by pilots, who saw a haze over Arctic, mainly dominant in the winter o The pooling is the main cause o Constituents Mainly sulphate, 10-20 times larger, compared to Toronto, other cities The sulphate fix with unconbusted carbon and they block the sunlight and a haze appears 90% sulphate, rest is carbon Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) How did they get there? Why they pool in Arctic In Arctic not much precipitation Need condensation for precipitation to form Arctic has a very stable atmosphere, not much changing other than sunlight that sometimes melt the snow Circumpolar circulation o Prevents all warm water from other parts of ocean to mix with cold parts of Arctic o Keeping Arctic
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