Class Notes (836,216)
Canada (509,690)
English (1,499)
ENGB03H3 (53)
Lecture

ENGB03Lec04.docx

6 Pages
46 Views
Unlock Document

Department
English
Course
ENGB03H3
Professor
Sonja Nikkila
Semester
Fall

Description
ENGB03: Lecture 4 subtitle: Dance, Puppets! The Narrator: Mwa. Ha. Ha. Topics: Business, lecture exercises, Middlemarch Introductory: author vs. narrator Hearing voices: narrator & person First things first: first­person narration Ghost & prophets: the Penelopiad narrator Telling stories: Harry, the Unreliable Narrator Etc. ­lecture exercise the picture: analyze who the narrator is now the person who is taking the picture, passive, capturing the events, because he is present in them  and is affected by them password: no chalk ­Middlemarch money MATTERS ­a narrative is a performance!  Descriptions, lots and lots of tricks Author vs. narrator   ­the rule: the author is NOT the narrator not even if they have the same name a narrative – for our purposes – is a work of fiction an author is a nonfictional person ­there are multiple viewpoints in a narrative: character, narrator, author, the “implied reader” ­these viewpoints often clash, and none of them will necessarily line up with your viewpoint ­where and how the viewpoints diverge is where we start to see what the narrative is really “about” ­Grammar Lesson First person (singular) – I went to class. Third person ( singular) – He/She went to class. First person (plural) – We went to class. Third person (plural) ­ They  went to class. Second person (singular) – You went to class. Ex. If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler, by Italo Calvino Doesn’t get a lot of play To be second­person narration, the voice HAS to be CONSISTENT Who, exactly is the “you”? (the “implied reader”) Past Tense – I went to class yesterday. Present Tense – I am in class right now. Indicates that the narrator has no idea what will happen next Future Tense – I will go to class tomorrow. Hint: pronouns are boring but really useful hints ­First­person narration ­Ghosts & Prophets: The Penelopiad Narrator Ghost:Sense of haunting  Not quite fully present, lingers in the backgrounds Prophets: supernatural power to see things that other people can’t see, always hinting, important  for the “tense” of the narrator “Now that I’m dead I know everything”  tends to get dragged out as a sign that Penelopiad knew everything but the second part states that  she doesn’t actually know everything – points her out as a liar – reader gets entirely trapped in  what is the truth and what isn’t – a very honest liar every work of fiction lies being a narrator is very invasive procedure – watches the other characters dangerously closely –  the narrator also has motivation Penelopiad: Penelope just wants her turn The narrator is often not understood, gives ideas that we may not understand because we are not  following closely enough or don’t see the big picture Penelopiad: the suggestion of madness, she strongly acknowledges her story IS a story – but can  be false at times because s
More Less

Related notes for ENGB03H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit