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Lecture

Lecture 3

3 Pages
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Department
English
Course Code
ENGB03H3
Professor
Melba Cuddy- Keane

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Description
-1September 29 : Narrative Pride & Prejudice Lecture 3 Glossary Words: à focalization/focalisation à free indirect discourse (FID); narrated monologue Focus on the relation between Elizabeth and Darcy. The relation between Elizabeth’s conscious, subconscious, and acting selves. Eyes: à Elizabeth’s “fine eyes”, how characters look at each other & look at each other looking at others, how the novel invites us to look: through whose eyes? The Attraction of Friction: à disagreement, but he’s amused (his smile) something more is going on in this conversation than just the disagreement. à “she had no share” = something intimate going on à powerpoint on blackboard to get breakdown of what each character is saying Reading Character; Reading Minds: à we see miss bingley’s view of Darcy and Elizabeth and her jealousy à we also perceive there may be something to be jealous about à but are either Darcy or Elizabeth aware of the intimacy established by their banter? à Darcy’s smile and Miss Bingley’s _______________________________________________________________________ _ Focalization: a term that comes from photography and film. The perspective from which a narrative situation is seen. (“who sees?”) Reality is always perceived. It is always “focalized” through the receiver. The theme of seeing: à in that last line, do we go from the narrators eyes to Elizabeth’s eyes? (sour grape: “I don’t like him anyway”) Narrator and focalizor à focalization in narrative identifies “who sees?” or “who perceives?” … Narrated monologue: “the technique for rendering a character’s thought in his own idiom while maintaining the third-person reference and the basic tense of narration.” - Dorrit Cohn, transparent minds Free indirect discourse; FID à the thoughts or sensations of a character presented as they are actually occurring in that character’s mind à but presented by a narrator describing that character
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