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Lecture

ENGB30 Lecture Notes - Traditional Story, Multiple Choice


Department
English
Course Code
ENGB30
Professor
Laura Jane Wey

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What happens with these retellings?
The same story, but not
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How are they changing?
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What appeals to us
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Will focus on a character in each "unit" and look at retelling as a progression
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Assignment- Reading check
Short answers (5 words max)
1 hour test
Making sure we're keeping up with the readings
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LECTURE
What is a myth?
Undistinguishable tale - where what is fact or fiction is unknown
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Fictional metaphor, which helps us contextualize values/ beliefs within us
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Traditional story involving a phenomenon or supernatural event, involving a specific society/ collective
group of people
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Repeated to the point of being considered natural, bringing people together, from within, through a
common explanation
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Implemented through daily practice/ ritual
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Implications
Difficult to define origin, point of reference
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What separates/ unifies them?
Levels of contradictions
Affect on the myth and other subsequent versions
Questions the versions
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Kafka
Immortality becomes a curse, eternal anguish
1.
Not a well known version
2.
Inexplicable, myth created by Kafka?
3.
Also created by Kafka?
4.
No moral, but myth created from something truthful, which turned into myth because of the
inexplicable qualities
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All four myths could be turned into a timeline - development through stages
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We no longer have use for myth, but we still use it
An allegory of myth making
The myth in general could be taken for granted, and questions humanity's need for myth in order to
explain
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Left deliberately unclear
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Intro Lecture
Monday, September 12, 2011
4:51 PM
C.de Souza ENGB30H3 Page 1