Lecture 3

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Published on 8 Mar 2011
School
UTSC
Department
English
Course
ENGC39H3
Professor
Lecture 3
1700s Pamela epistolary fiction (story told in letters)
oForm didactic nature (Is Pamela really virtuous?)
oClass spoke to new class, values
oGender
Johnson, Samuel (Rambler)
oGood models of virtue are useful to us
oVice must always disgust raise hatred
Clarissa (by Richardson – written after Pamela)
oImitation is important
oInstructional value in novels
Novels are lifelike, but not rooted in history
Michael McKean
oQuestions of virtue
oQuestions of truth See reference A Million Little Lies book advertised as true
story that turned out to be fiction
What is true, how important is the truth?
Richardson as a preacher
oNo classical education he was not well learned
oInterested in instructional work
Pamela, Clarissa
Four different letter writers
Pamela letters and journals
oLetters have a sense of immediacy writing to the moment
oPlays with time always writes AFTER the even happens
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Document Summary

 1700s  pamela  epistolary fiction (story told in letters: form  didactic nature (is pamela really virtuous?, class  spoke to new class, values, gender.  johnson, samuel (rambler: good models of virtue are useful to us, vice must always disgust  raise hatred.  clarissa (by richardson written after pamela: imitation is important, instructional value in novels.  novels are lifelike, but not rooted in history.  michael mckean: questions of virtue, questions of truth  see reference a million little lies  book advertised as true story that turned out to be fiction.  richardson as a preacher: no classical education  he was not well learned, interested in instructional work.  problems with letter form: misreading possibilities  there"s no control of 3rd person narrative telling us what the moral is  easy to misinterpret.  richardson"s letters are designed for public and private audiences: not always solely private.