Class Notes (839,076)
Canada (511,183)
EESA06H3 (570)
N.Eyels (25)
Lecture

Lecture Notes #7 BIOA02 Module II

4 Pages
93 Views

Department
Environmental Science
Course Code
EESA06H3
Professor
N.Eyels

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 4 pages of the document.
Description
Lecture 7 Midterm – Mcqs + end of the chapter questions + glossary TERMS TO REMEMBER 1. Co­seismic deformation of coastlines during major earthquakes Processes happening at the same time as earthquake. 2. Co­seismic uplift and subsidence After an earthquake there’s an uplift­ rise and fall – subsidence.  ▯ that makes changes in the land form. Geologists can   read these land forms to find out when and what happened. 3. Ghost forests (drowned forests produced by co­seismic subsidence) In Alaska ▯ forests that were killed by subsidence. The salt water has got in and killed the trees. (They just look like  dead trees, but actually are earthquake activities.) 4. Paleoseismology ▯  ancient – identifying when the earthquaked occurred and project to the future. 5. Recurrence THmes of major earthquakes ▯ frequency of earthquakes. ( FUSAKICHI OMORI AND JOHN  MILINE: 19  CENTUARY POINEERS OF SEISPOLOGY) But it’s actually a short amount of time we only have been  recording. 6. Seismic gaps ▯  the epicenter ▯ directly above the focus  ▯ WHERE the earthquake happens. The quickest way to  find out is to see where it is NOT happening. This is known as seismic gap. A seismic gap is an overdue of  earthquakes. 7. Gap filling earthquakes – when the big earthquakes happen and fill the seismic gap. 8. Richter scale (degree of shaking measured from seismograms) The amount of shaking that occurs during an earthquake. There is 1­10 log scale. How much energy it produces. See  page 76­79. Expressed from 1 to 10 on a logarithmic scale (see pp. 76­9 in text) BUT a 32 fold increase in energy from  one Richter magnitude to another. – Amount of energy increased. 9. Modified Mercalli scale (measures damage)  10. Amplification and suppression of earthquake energy by local geologic conditions wet rock or dry rock – could affect the earthquake. 11. SEISMITES­ deformed rocks – studying geological deformaties?   Details – not much • Chapters 1­4 Pacific Rim – where oceanic crust is being subducted. (Recycling of oceanic crust to make continental crust) The ocean is closing • Mega cities – cities that are growing very quickly. Pacific Rim is a dynamic economic and geographic area comprising over 48% of the world trade. It is more vulnerable to geological hazards. The emerging mega cities around the Rim are called “CITIES ON THE EDGE”. Canada is a Pacific Rim country. • Viscosity – The thickness • ANDESTIC VOLCANOES – The most dangerous of Volcanoes. Volcanoes are dangerous but also useful. The Pacific Rim is very resourceful.  We can find Copper :] Pulfery and Obsedian ? The lava when it cools fast.  The minerals gets deposited and you can find dykes? (stockworts? – the intersecting dykes) Chuquicamata – open pit mine in notheren chilie.  Peacock ORE – a rock that contains a lot of mineral you can mine it. Copper comes from within waste rocks. Slide 5 San Andreas Fault­ no subduct
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit