Class Notes (922,431)
CA (542,813)
UTSC (32,897)
GASA01H3 (55)
Liang Chen (17)
Lecture 3

week 3 journal

2 Pages
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Department
Global Asia Studies
Course Code
GASA01H3
Professor
Liang Chen

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Xuan Zang was a Chinese Buddhism monk, scholar, and traveller. His brother was a
Buddhist monk who influenced him to join the rank of the monks. They moved to Changan
during the Tang Dynasty, and studied Buddhism in the temples. Unlike his peers, he was
dissatisfied with the systems of teaching in China, many of which emphasized on different
texts, and often depended on the Buddhist masters own interpretations. A few monks and
scholars prior to his time had pilgrimage to India to bring valuable Buddhist relics and
scriptures back into China. Against the will of his brother and the Tang emperor, he decided
to travel to India to search for knowledge. During his travel to India, he studied with many
famous Buddhist masters, often engaged in theological discussions and debates. He
received tremendous supports from neighbouring kingdoms during his journey, they
provided him with entourage and silk, an accepted currency in many parts of Asia during
his time; one of the many contributing factors to his safe arrival at the renowned Nalanda
monastery in India. When he returned, he brought with him 657 Sanskrit texts, plus
several relics and statues. By then the Emperor has already forgiven him and provided an
imperial escort for his journey back. The end of his journey set off a flurry of diplomatic
missions between China and India, and connected China to the outside world even faster
than trade. He dedicated the rest of his life in Changan, supervising a team of translators
and teaching Buddhist texts. As a result of his accomplishments, Buddhism flourished in
China.
Han Dynasty appeared shortly after Qin Shi Huang Dis death in 210 B.C.E.; rebel
groups occupied the capital and burned the previous palace. The leader of the groups name
is Liu Bang who formed the Han Dynasty. Spanning over four centuries, the period of the
Han Dynasty is considered a golden age in Chinese history. The territorial, political, and
social shapes of present China was shaped during this period. By this time, China was
already highly developed technologically as well as culturally. The first emperor emphasized
on Confucian teachings, and precept that government exists to serve the people and unruly
emperors are unworthy to rule the country. He abolished many rules set by the previous Qin
Dynasty, including controls on travel. Liu Bangs descendent, Wu Di, tightened his imperial
control. He initiated a program of new conquests, included the takeover of the Yue Kingdom
(Vietnam) and North Korea. He also wanted to conquest Central Asia, and reach Rome, but
his dream was demolished because his troops and supply were both exhausted, and Central
Asian emperors were formidable opponents that were eager to retain their middleman
status in the silk trade business. Han Dynasty made major contribution to the world. They
officially sponsored Confucianism in education and court politics. Science and technology
during the Han period saw great advances, such as papermaking, the use of negative
number in mathematics, and water mill. Near the end of Han Dynasty, landlord power and
oppression grew, and there were a large number of peasant revolts. The ultimate collapse of
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Description
Xuan Zang was a Chinese Buddhism monk, scholar, and traveller. His brother was a Buddhist monk who influenced him to join the rank of the monks. They moved to Changan during the Tang Dynasty, and studied Buddhism in the temples. Unlike his peers, he was dissatisfied with the systems of teaching in China, many of which emphasized on different texts, and often depended on the Buddhist masters own interpretations. A few monks and scholars prior to his time had pilgrimage to India to bring valuable Buddhist relics and scriptures back into China. Against the will of his brother and the Tang emperor, he decided to travel to India to search for knowledge. During his travel to India, he studied with many famous Buddhist masters, often engaged in theological discussions and debates. He received tremendous supports from neighbouring kingdoms during his journey, they provided him with entourage and silk, an accepted currency in many parts of Asia during his time; one of the many contributing factors to his safe arrival at the renowned Nalanda monastery in India. When he returned, he brought with him 657 Sanskrit texts, plus several relics and statues. By then the Emperor has already forgiven him and provided an imperial escort for his journey back. The end of his journey set off a flurry of diplomatic missions between China and India, and connected China to the outside world even faster than trade. He dedicated the rest of his life in Changan, supervising a team of translators and teaching Buddhist texts. As a result of his accomplishments, Buddhism flourished in China. Han Dynasty appeared sho
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