Class Notes (905,950)
CA (538,541)
UTSC (32,637)
GASA01H3 (46)
Liang Chen (17)
Lecture 4

week 4 journal

1 Page
49 Views

Department
Global Asia Studies
Course Code
GASA01H3
Professor
Liang Chen

This preview shows half of the first page. Sign up to view the full page of the document.
The transfer of wisdom and knowledge took place between Europe and Asia through the
Silk Road. Between the Roman Empire and East Asia (China) and India, Central Asia also
took form as a complex political and philosophical place of interest. Ibn Sina (also known as
Avicenna) wrote books on healing, medicine, philosophy, and military, among others. He
was probably one of the most influential characters in Central Asia during his time. He
loved to read and translated many foreign texts to Persian, including Greek medical texts
and philosophies. He was betrayed by his fellow scholars who wanted him imprisoned. And
while in prison he wrote the Canon of Medicine, which was the standard medical text in
many medieval universities. Knowledge that got passed down during his time was by
traders and scholars, who would sell European made books and merchandises along the
Silk Road. They would trade with Central Asian and East Asian merchants and bring back
merchandises along with their secrets from those areas. Less often but more effectively,
rampaged wars and territorial occupations have had a major impact in these areas.
Technology was transferred to occupied regions as bigger nations engulfed smaller ones. Ibn
Sina became famous for his medical texts during this time, and many nations wanted him
as an ornament in their kingdom as a sign of power. Later he would have to hide out from
nation to nation, with the help of his loyal students. As he once said, I grew so big that no
city could hold me, but my price went so high every buyer has sold me. He understood that
he was both an asset and a liability to any kingdom. Despite his danger, he continued to
write and publish treatises. During his later years, he became a well known Islamic
philosopher, contempt with Aristotlelianism. His contribution reflect many other Islamic
and middle eastern philosophers during his time, and through a complex integrated system
of distribution, their knowledge and wisdom transferred to Europe and the rest of Asia.
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
The transfer of wisdom and knowledge took place between Europe and Asia through the Silk Road. Between the Roman Empire and East Asia (China) and India, Central Asia also took form as a complex political and philosophical place of interest. Ibn Sina (also known as Avicenna) wrote books on healing, medicine, philosophy, and military, among others. He was probably one of the most influential characters in Central Asia during his time. He loved to read and translated many foreign texts to Persian, including Greek medical texts and philosophies. He was betrayed by his fellow scholars who wanted him imprisoned. And while in prison he wrote the Canon of Medicine, which was the standard medical text in many medieval universities. Knowledge that got passed down during his time was by traders and scholars, who would sell European made books and merchandises along the Silk Road. They would trade with Central Asian and East Asian merchants and bring back merchandises along with their secrets from those areas. Less often but more effectively, rampa
More Less
Unlock Document


Only half of the first page are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit