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Lecture 4

Lecture 4 – Modernity and Utopias
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Department
Geography
Course
GGRA03H3
Professor
Andre Sorensen
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 4 – Modernity and Utopias th ­Important aspect to understand what happened to cities during the 19  century. ▯ Modernity ­ Modernity is the belief of continuous progress for improvements and technical solutions to  problems. ­ Product of the enlightenment and scientific revolution. ­ Influenced by the rapid economic growth and new technologies.   ­ Social problems could be fixed with technology. ­ Getting rid of backward ways of rural areas and replacing poverty (poorness) of agriculture. ­ Idea that contrasts “tradition” and “modernity” ▯ Modernity and Europe ­ Ideas of modernity were highly Eurocentric ­ Orientalism is the Eurocentric idea that Middle­East societies were underdeveloped while Europe  was developing and superior. ­ Modernity overcome tradition, which is less advanced and unchanging. ­ Change represented progress and the future.  ­ European colonization was justified as a project to civilize that rest of the world, which was seen  to them as “traditional “and backward (not modern). ▯ Modernity and the City ­ Modernity influential for urban thinking. ­ Problems of the city could be solved with technology, investment, and new policies. ­ “ The ideal city” seems achievable and would change society. ­ Urban reform would bring better living conditions, but also transform into a more equal society. ­ Could be achieved quickly and easily. Modernity – Refers to the period starting with the Enlightenment (1650­1750), which is  characterized by the rejection of tradition and religious rule in Europe. th Modernism – A movement in art, literature and architecture beginning in the early 20  century  that celebrated technology and progression. ­ The modern movement was the most important 20  century movement in architecture.  ▯ Utopia ­ Describes the ideas of an ideal or “perfect” community or society: usually with abundant food,  good housing, beautiful, and with no poverty. th ­ Long perio
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