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GGRA03H3 (139)
Lecture

Lecture 1

4 Pages
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Department
Geography
Course Code
GGRA03H3
Professor
Andre Sorensen

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5 Main Themes/Conceptual Frameworks of
GGRA03
This lecture, apart from introducing the assignments, focused on 5
main conceptual frameworks that are introduced in the course:
1. Cities as the Human Environment
The City // Nature dualism is mistaken, and the term environment does not
equal 'nature' or 'wilderness. The environment and nature include cities and
people.
Modernist ideas that equated progress with technology and 'overcoming
nature', by creating well-built urban systems have had powerful and lasting
impacts on our society. Recently, ideas are changing. Now cities are
increasingly seen as complex ecological systems, in which economic, social,
natural, and political systems interact.
Cities in this view are the most complex and lasting creations of human
civilization - they are the fundamental human ecosystem.
A major goal of this course is to learn to understand cities as human
environments:
What can we learn about our societies from changing urban ecosystems,
environmental ideas, urban policies and urban patterns?
How have ideas about 'good' and 'bad' (utopian and dystopian) urban
environments changed over recent centuries?
How have such ideas shaped policy and action and urban development?
More on this in Lectures 2, 3 and 4
2. Why History is Important
a.Understanding long-term patterns
Urban systems are rapidly growing more complex, but most contemporary
urban systems, structures, infrastructures, are built incrementally on
prior systems.
Urban change is gradual and incremental. To understand how things
work, and how they change - or fail to change - it is important to
understand the historical moments when major urban institutions and
codes, policies, rules were developed.
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Description
5 Main ThemesConceptual Frameworks of GGRA03 This lecture, apart from introducing the assignments, focused on 5 main conceptual frameworks that are introduced in the course: 1. Cities as the Human Environment The City Nature dualism is mistaken, and the term environment does not equal nature or wilderness. The environment and nature include cities and people. Modernist ideas that equated progress with technology and overcoming nature, by creating well-built urban systems have had powerful and lasting impacts on our society. Recently, ideas are changing. Now cities are increasingly seen as complex ecological systems, in which economic, social, natural, and political systems interact. Cities in this view are the most complex and lasting creations of human civilization - they are the fundamental human ecosystem. A major goal of this course is to learn to understand cities as human environments: What can we learn about our societies from changing urban ecosystems, environmental ideas, urban policies and urban patterns? How have ideas about good and bad (utopian and dystopian) urban environments changed over recent centuries? How have such ideas shaped policy and action and urban development? More on this in Lectures 2, 3 and 4 2. Why History is Important a. Understanding long-term patterns Urban systems are rapidly growing more complex, but most contemporary urban systems, structures, infrastructures, are built incrementally on prior systems. Urban change is gradual and incremental. To understand how things work, and how they change - or fail to change - it is important to understand the historical moments when major urban institutions and codes, policies, rules were developed. www.notesolution.com
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