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Lecture 10

Socio-spatial polarization Lecture 10

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Department
Geography
Course Code
GGRA03H3
Professor
Andre Sorensen

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10 Socio-spatial polarization
Spatial Divisions in the City
Hills, water bodies, better scenery spatial sorting factors
Different levels of amenity in the city example: places with good shopping, nice
view, big trees, green environment, fresh air, good school = makes areas more
desirable which are distributed unequally among cities (more expensive to live in)
WEALTH: People who are wealthier can afford better living environment with
higher amenity
RACE AND ETHNICITY
OCCUPATION
AGE: Age is a spatial sorting factor, for example, downtown and near universities
are populated by youth mainly, youth are more tolerant of noise and they want to go
out (near clubs)
SEXUAL PREFERENCE: gay people and lesbians tend to cluster together in certain
areas
Sorting Process
BY PRICE: People who are wealthier can afford better living environment with more
facilities, prices for more attractive living environment will go up
Consequences? People who have less income wont have a very good living
environment
People who are rich invest in their own area (self-reinforcement)
Places where poor people live will continue to decline in quality
Patterns in 1970 Poor area downtown (highly concentrated poverty),
Northern/Western Toronto is highly populated by the rich, much of the rest of the
city is considered to be average
Patterns in 2000 Huge suburbanization of poverty, disappearing middle class
(People are either really rich or really poor)
Gentrification: process of upgrading in poor neighbourhoods because rich people are
buying cheap property and renovating it (rich outbid the poor)
Wealth is clearly a powerful factor that is sorting out population into different spaces
in Toronto
These changes are extremely rapid
The degree of consistent change in particular neighbourhoods is dramatic
Race and Place
People tend to voluntary cluster by ethnicity
Involuntary segregation of particular groups
Spatial Sorting Process
In Toronto, people are free to live where they want
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Description
10 Socio-spatial polarization Spatial Divisions in the City Hills, water bodies, better scenery spatial sorting factors Different levels of amenity in the city example: places with good shopping, nice view, big trees, green environment, fresh air, good school = makes areas more desirable which are distributed unequally among cities (more expensive to live in) WEALTH: People who are wealthier can afford better living environment with higher amenity RACE AND ETHNICITY OCCUPATION AGE: Age is a spatial sorting factor, for example, downtown and near universities are populated by youth mainly, youth are more tolerant of noise and they want to go out (near clubs) SEXUAL PREFERENCE: gay people and lesbians tend to cluster together in certain areas Sorting Process BY PRICE: People who are wealthier can afford better living environment with more facilities, prices for more attractive living environment will go up Consequences? People who have less income wont have a very good living environment People
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