GGRB28H3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 7: Iranian Diaspora, Jewish Diaspora, Swine Influenza

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27 Nov 2013
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GGRB28 Lecture 7- Nov 1, 2012
American, Feminization of the Urban, Ruralization (3 phases of geography of
blame)
What was the main reason for the decline in AIDS deaths after 1995?
new drug therapies that were actually working
the affordability and accessibility of these treatments -> more people
could afford these, hence saving more lives
We knew what we were looking for then, HIV/AIDS could be diagnosed
earlier
What are the main reasons that Aboriginal people have more AIDS cases that
non-Aboriginal people?
overall higher rates of poverty . Those who live on reserves, they have less
access to healthcare (sporadic, bad quality, etc.)
higher rates of drug and alcohol use in this community
Residential school programs
Hence, leading to a population that’s more at risk
Someone of Aboriginal decent living with non-Aboriginals is twice likely to
live in poverty
Farmer would not consider a TB a new disease -> it’s reemerging or changing
Swine flu was an alteration to Spanish flu
Ebola is not a new disease, but we’re seeing it more now, and more people
understand it
Orange bubble (Farmer’s geography of blame): often times the victims are
blamed; using stereotypes of populations to support theories of spread and
expansion
When is a disease considered a pandemic? It’s an epidemic that spreads to a
larger population
Sample Question:
List and explain that five ways living in a refugee camp can impact one’s
health
IN THE NEWS….
Social determinants of health
Inclusion, diabetes
Most toxic neighbourhoods were thisletown
IN THEW NEWS..
New UN atlas links climate change, health
Rates of meningitis go up in dry seasons and after dust storms, and dengue
fever goes up after heavy rainfalls
DISCUSSION
Language barriers
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takes time to make OHIP card
Knowledge of a new disease
Change in lifestyle -> healthy diet back home but when they come here, it’s a
much unhealthier one
Getting used to weather changes
Demographics: some people are able to adapt to new environments (young
people) whereas it’s harder for older aged people; social inclusion and
exclusion
TYPES OF MIGRATION
Historical/Current
slave trade
Current movements of Iraq
Jewish diaspora
Voluntary/Forced
Voluntary are those who apply to emigrate to get a better job and lifestyle
Students who come to school
Forced migration: forced removal from your country/home through disease,
famine, natural disaster
Permanent/Temporary
People will come and work for five years and then go back to their home
Temporary workers, farmers, allowed to Canada for a particularly time
period then they go home
Distance of Travel (regional/international)
International: geographies of blame
movements that are regional: England south more wealthy than North
There are multitudes of reasons why they move
DEFINITION OF MIGRATION
The movement of people from one place to another
This can be temporary, for work, for leisure, retirement
DEFINITION OF IMMIGRATION
Permanent change of residence of either an individuals or a group of
individuals
Assumed that immigrants would adopt and assimilate to their new country
Melting Pot versus Multiculturalism
The advent of globalization
Communication wasn’t easy back in the day; no real connection to their
homeland
Even today, immigration is seen as permanent movement
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