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Lecture

mortality and epidemics lecture

2 Pages
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Department
Geography
Course Code
GGRC02H3
Professor
Elrick

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GGRC02 LEC MORTALITY AND EPIDEMICS 20:15
Feb 09/2011
GGRC02 LEC MORTALITY AND EPIDEMICS
- developing countries the demographic transition started after WWII
- was quicker in developed countries because of availability of medical
- half of all deaths used to occur under the age of five, made it past this, healthy life
until late 20s early thirties
- after domestication of animals and advanced agricultural techniques, humans
settled, brought up infectious diseases
due to a denser pop'n and poor sanitation in these settlements
- illness and diseases travelled through trades between these settlements
- public health initiatives in the late 18th c from businessmen to protect workers in
their factories
- TB, bronchitis, pneumonia prevalent in the time
- diptheria was only eradicated by large scale immunization programs
- epidemiological transition:
brought different causes of death
from infectious and acute illnesses, now suffer from more chronic and degenerative
diseases
40% of all death in developing world children under age of five
2% under 20 in developed world die
developed world elderly die more
- crude death rate: (number of deaths/ total pop'n) * 1000
- IMR= (number of children <1/ number of live births) * 1000
- UN called to action in 2000 to reduce child mortality rates by 2/3 btween 1990-
2015:
UN millennium development goals
Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
Declined by half since 1980-2009
To achieve universal primary education
To promote gender equality and empower women
To reduce child mortality rate
To improve maternal health
To combat HIV/AIDS
To ensure environmental sustainability
To develop a global partnership for development
- mortality differs by gender:
females live longer
men do more hazardous jobs
females have more social support
- mortality differs by class
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Description
GGRC02 LEC MORTALITY AND EPIDEMICS 20:15 Feb 092011 GGRC02 LEC MORTALITY AND EPIDEMICS - developing countries the demographic transition started after WWII - was quicker in developed countries because of availability of medical - half of all deaths used to occur under the age of five, made it past this, healthy life until late 20s early thirties - after domestication of animals and advanced agricultural techniques, humans settled, brought up infectious diseases due to a denser popn and poor sanitation in these settlements - illness and diseases travelled through trades between these settlements - public health initiatives in the late 18 c from businessmen to protect workers in their factories - TB, bronchitis, pneumonia prevalent in the time - diptheria was only eradicated by large scale immunization programs - epidemiological transition: brought different causes of death
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