GGRC 24 Lecture 8: Lecture 8

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Department
Geography
Course Code
GGRC24H3
Professor
Michael Ekers

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Lecture – Gender
Notes for essay
oDefine key terms and concepts – naturalization, wilderness
oParagraph after introduction on defining terms and concepts and telling reader
how you are using it
oWhen appropriate, write in first person – personal
oWhy is your argument important
Haraway argument
oFluidity between nature and culture but there are certain stereotypes that still exist
with regards to these categories
Kate S
oThe ways in which she discusses a passionate homeosociality – passionate
relationship between men in wilderness spaces that is okay because those men are
accompanied by women
oThink through park spaces as they relate to questions of sexuality
oTalking about rocky mountain and Banff – icon of what the Canadian nation
could and should be – she talks about empty nature as spaces that come to
Sandilands quote
oArgument is that a gendered binary between public and private space (male
gender and women who does reproductive work in households) gets constructed
into nature
oThese binaries that we would associate with post world war 2 era (mens work in
factories and women and reproductive work in households) get pushed into
wilderness spaces
oThese parks were spaces in which men could perform their masculinity – related
to grace piece
oQuote #2 – in order
Goes through the processes of assisted migration – active recruiting of
women to the frontier to give us a sense of the frontier in these wilderness
spaces
Domesticated labour getting pushed to the frontier
Sense that women could bring a softer edge to the colonial project
The politics of independence and dependence
oNotions of independence and dependence get gendered in certain ways
oSandilands
If you think about all of these colonial narratives about men finding
themselves in wilderness spaces, the main point is that they are always
dependent on others
In the past, when SH went up to the Canadian north to show his
masculinity, there were women who were supporting the expedition by
supporting his kids while he was gone
Questions
oHow is wilderness sexualized?
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Description
Lecture – Gender  Notes for essay o Define key terms and concepts – naturalization, wilderness o Paragraph after introduction on defining terms and concepts and telling reader how you are using it o When appropriate, write in first person – personal o Why is your argument important  Haraway argument o Fluidity between nature and culture but there are certain stereotypes that still exist with regards to these categories  Kate S o The ways in which she discusses a passionate homeosociality – passionate relationship between men in wilderness spaces that is okay because those men are accompanied by women o Think through park spaces as they relate to questions of sexuality o Talking about rocky mountain and Banff – icon of what the Canadian nation could and should be – she talks about empty nature as spaces that come to  Sandilands quote o Argument is that a gendered binary between public and private space (male gender and women who does reproductive work in households) gets constructed into nature o These binaries that we would associate with post world war 2 era (mens work in factories and women and reproductive work in households) get pushed into wilderness spaces o These parks were spaces in which men could perform their masculinity – related to grace piece o Quote #2 – in order  Goes through the processes of assisted migration – active recruiting of women to the frontier to give us a sense of the frontier in these wilderness spaces  Domesticated labour getting pushed to the frontier  Sense that women could bring a softer edge to the colonial project  The politics of independence and dependence o Notions of independence and dependence get gendered in certain ways o Sandilands  If you think about all of these colonial narratives about men finding themselves in wilderness spaces, the main point is that they are always dependent on others  In the past, when SH went up to the Canadian north to show his masculinity, there were women who were supporting the expedition by supporting his kids while he was gone  Questions o How is wilderness sexualized?  You can think of wilderness spaces as gendered but how are they sexualized?  How do relationships of intimacy and desire get thrown onto wilderness spaces?  They are set to be a sight for family getaways and romanticized  Key points about sexuality o Sexual practices and identities just like race and gender are a lot more fluid in contradictory o No divided line that says you are this or you are that  Sexuality and wilderness o Sandilands – the ways in which gender and sexuality come to bear here are interested to think about how gender is structured by sexuality but also how wilderness spaces are constructed by sexuality  Eroticizing the land o Frontier spaces are said to be feminized o Attachments to space that are feminized o This map is one that leads three English men to south Africa – desir
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