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Lecture 15

Lecture 15

3 Pages
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Department
History
Course Code
HISB31H3
Professor
Neville Panthaki

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February - November: Revolutions of 1917
- consequences of the collapse Russian monarchy and why the revolution (short time period
with vast changes/consequences) continued
- as of February - two contending rivals provisional government and Petrograd Soviet (dual
power)
- organized as soviets (people's council)
- Provisional government was simply caretaker government, so had no authority in
itself to continue the tsar's policies
- Petrograd Soviet issued manifesto of its own - Order #1 (March 1)
-- later on expanded by Lenin to April Theses (April 3)
1, stated Petrograd Soviet claimed sole supremacy;
2, provisional government did not have any justification to exist;
3, provisional government already discredited itself under the name of the people
(to continue tsarism)
- Lenin decided to remark on what the Bolshevik party within Petrograd Soviet stood for
=/= coalition, stood by ruling by themselves
- other parties would not stand for the same platform with Bolsheviks sole legitimacy of
government should stand for people's interests, and would not combine powers unless
platform was similar to the Bolsheviks to:
1. end the war (no way in winning - end to hostilities)
2. immediate land reform (transfer of power) - freedom not accompanied by land Æ
serfs could not have ownership of the land they were working on, needed to dispossess
landlords - those who work the land own the land
3. to end dual power, all legitimate power of the government should rest within the
Soviets (council of workers or people - bottom-up) -- entire union of Soviets countrywide
3. Kornilov affair (end of August)
- provisional government decided to try to use force to organize, used a coup from above
- bring troops within region of capital, surround Petrograd Soviet to use force and
intimidation to disperse the Soviets
- General understood that he held the power - but tried to disband provisional government
and take over to establish a military dictatorship
- coup brought to an end because members of the Petrograd Soviet (militiamen and
soldiers) began street battles with General's troops and defeated them
1. provisional government lost legitimacy
2. Petrograd soviet claimed more justification as sole authority of power
4. Bolsheviks decided on voting to decide on what to do -- seize power (October 23)
- no need to adopt constitutional means or legality (Æ corrupt)
5. Bolsheviks seize power November 7 -- Revolution
- inability to stop this from happening - controlled Russia overnight
Edict: declare Russia was transferring out of the war
was to transfer all land to the Soviets
all cities and townships should be organized in Soviet councils and link into union
- all of Allies against Russia as Russia pulled out of the war alone - would not carry out what
tsar signed to and claimed not to repay debts (as they were imperial monies - against the
people)
- nationalism of state affairs/diplomacy - that claimed anything before the nation is
not of any concern of the nation
- openly proclaimed that they would not hold with French or British treaties
regarding outcome of Ottoman territories - already made secret plans with tsar to divide
- Civil War 1918-1921 (involved Japan (60k to Siberia), USA (10k in Pacific),
www.notesolution.com

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Description
February - November: Revolutions of 1917 - consequences of the collapse Russian monarchy and why the revolution (short time period with vast changesconsequences) continued - as of February - two contending rivals provisional government and Petrograd Soviet (dual power) - organized as soviets (peoples council) - Provisional government was simply caretaker government, so had no authority in itself to continue the tsars policies - Petrograd Soviet issued manifesto of its own - Order #1 (March 1) -- later on expanded by Lenin to April Theses (April 3) 1, stated Petrograd Soviet claimed sole supremacy; 2, provisional government did not have any justification to exist; 3, provisional government already discredited itself under the name of the people (to continue tsarism) - Lenin decided to remark on what the Bolshevik party within Petrograd Soviet stood for == coalition, stood by ruling by themselves - other parties would not stand for the same platform with Bolsheviks sole legitimacy of government should stand for peoples interests, and would not combine powers unless platform was similar to the Bolsheviks to: 1. end the war (no way in winning - end to hostilities) 2. immediate land reform (transfer of power) - freedom not accompanied by land serfs could not have ownership of the land they were working on, needed to dispossess landlords - those who work the land own the land 3. to end dual power, all legitimate power of the government should rest within the Soviets (council of workers or people - bottom-up) -- entire union of Soviets countrywide 3. Kornilov affair (end of August) - provisional govern
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