Class Notes (920,269)
CA (542,226)
UTSC (32,855)
History (740)
HISB41H3 (45)
Lecture

Lecture 4: The Troubling Twenties

9 Pages
118 Views

Department
History
Course Code
HISB41H3
Professor
C Pennington

This preview shows pages 1-3. Sign up to view the full 9 pages of the document.
The Troubled Twenties, 1919-29
January-31-11
2:05 PM
-period in which the country remains traumatized by WWI
-emotional toll of war tolled heavily on Canadians; never experienced large volume of
deaths in one war
-very few Canadians did not know anyone who died in the war
-desire for things to go back to normal: conservative impulse
-relative full employment during the war
-Canadian government did poor job of helping surviving soldiers transition back into
regular life
-in the USA 1920s was a era of economic growth, contrary to Canada [Troubled
Twenties]
-1926 is when country recovered from post-war recession
-brief economic boom before the Great Depression
The Spanish Influenza (1918-19):
-thought to have first emerged in Spain
-estimated 21 million died worldwide (~50,000 Canadians died) Department of Health
created in 1919
-spread by soldiers [tended to be kept in close quarters for long periods of time]
-caused overreaction by immune system
-young strong healthy people most severely affected by the flu
-old people generally faired better
-many soldiers who had managed WWI came home only to be killed by influenza
-alerted Canadians that there was no national strategy to cope with outbreak
Winnipeg General Strike, May-June 1919
-when done well, an organized strike can effectively shut down particular sector of city
-labour prospered during the war; wages rose substantially
-considerable government suspicion of unions; seemed unpatriotic
-many Eastern Europeans who had come to Canada and who were active in the union
-beginning of May building and welding workers of the city went out on strike against
their employers
-primary concern being right of collective bargaining
-employers were not willing to grant collective bargaining
-May 15, 1919 after a vote a general strike was called
-expected that most of the union workers would go out on strike
-approximately 25,000 people went on strike in support of the building and welding
unions
-whole city effectively shut down
www.notesolution.com
-strikers coordinated central strike committee (15 members)
-idea was to make sure essential services were still provided
-"Do nothing. Just eat sleep, pray, love, play, and watch the sun set."
-allow profits of the businesses of the cities to halt
-citizens committee of 1,000 formed in response to strike committee, bent on defeating
the strike
-citizens committee depicted the strike as the beginning of a communist conspiracy to
overthrow the government of Canada
-citizens committee created the newspaper The Citizens
-increasing tension between two committees
-response of government was unsympathetic to workers
-a week before the strike came to its bloody conclusion, many leaders of the strike were
arrested and deported
-June 21, 1919 government responded with currently assembled special constables and
RCMP to break up the strike
-"Bloody Saturday": 2 people were killed and 30 injured approximately
-Winnipeg went back to business as usual
-unions were severely weakened
-unions across the country affected
-government of Manitoba commissioned royal commission to investigate the strike;
findings found that strike was not bent on revolution, citizens committee largely
overreacted
-20s were difficult for labour
Arthur Meighen (1874-1960)
-noted as one of the best debaters
-Borden felt that Meighen was too narrow-minded; lacked broad-minded to appreciate
what was good about the other side of the argument
-the 'attack dog'
-Thomas White was asked to be prime minister by Borden, refused
-Meighen well liked in the Conservative party
-not destined to serve long-term
-great rival was William Lyon Mackenzie King
William Lyon Mackenzie King
-born in Berlin, ON
-born in middle-class family with one claim to fame: grandfather was William Lyon
Mackenzie, the leader of rebellion in 1770s
-felt he would encourage positive change in Canada
-attended several prominent schools
-graduate of the University of Toronto and Harvard
-eventually earned a Ph. D in 1909; only Canadian prime minister to have a Ph. D
www.notesolution.com
-became wealthy and well-known around North America as a negotiator
-King knew how to make compromise between two opposing parties
-worked for large U.S. companies working out labour disputes
-had a relatively positive view of the U.S.
-"American"
-opposed conscription during WWI; went over well with Quebec
-King would serve as party leader from 1919-1948
-prime minister 1921-26, 1926-30, 1935-48
-not a charismatic figure
-was not a good speaker
-King did not like to be pinned down to any specific policy
-was not personally popular; defeated in his riding several times
-great talent for compromise and conciliation
-good political instincts
-good at keeping Liberal party united, exposed weaknesses in Conservative party
-good at managing people
-consistently re-elected
-Conservatives constantly associated with war, economic downturn
-King proved to be figure of national unity
-"He divided us least."
-prime ministers should not be judged by what they achieve, but what they prevent
King's 'Very Double Life'
-didn't have close friends
-lifelong bachelor
-when he won the Liberal leadership in 1919, he did not have anyone he could tell that
he won the leadership
-kept a diary which he wrote in every day
-diary was a constant companion
-wrote every thing down in the diary
-wrote about inner thoughts, feelings
-King had a lasting interest in a cult; connecting with the deceased
-greatly admired his mother
-best friend was his dog Pat
-when dog died, King was shaken and cancelled Cabinet meeting to sing to his dog
-reporters gave King a bronze statue of the dog
-bought an identical dog he named Pat
-enjoyed constructing ruined buildings into structures
Canadian Politics in the 1920s
-King Vs. Meighen bitter rivalry
-great measures or great accomplishments
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
The Troubled Twenties, 1919-29 January-31-11 2:05 PM -period in which the country remains traumatized by WWI -emotional toll of war tolled heavily on Canadians; never experienced large volume of deaths in one war -very few Canadians did not know anyone who died in the war -desire for things to go back to normal: conservative impulse -relative full employment during the war -Canadian government did poor job of helping surviving soldiers transition back into regular life -in the USA 1920s was a era of economic growth, contrary to Canada [Troubled Twenties] -1926 is when country recovered from post-war recession -brief economic boom before the Great Depression The Spanish Influenza (1918-19): -thought to have first emerged in Spain -estimated 21 million died worldwide (~50,000 Canadians died) Department of Health created in 1919 -spread by soldiers [tended to be kept in close quarters for long periods of time] -caused overreaction by immune system -young strong healthy people most severely affected by the flu -old people generally faired better -many soldiers who had managed WWI came home only to be killed by influenza -alerted Canadians that there was no national strategy to cope with outbreak Winnipeg General Strike, May-June 1919 -when done well, an organized strike can effectively shut down particular sector of city -labour prospered during the war; wages rose substantially -considerable government suspicion of unions; seemed unpatriotic -many Eastern Europeans who had come to Canada and who were active in the union -beginning of May building and welding workers of the city went out on strike against their employers -primary concern being right of collective bargaining -employers were not willing to grant collective bargaining -May 15, 1919 after a vote a general strike was called -expected that most of the union workers would go out on strike -approximately 25,000 people went on strike in support of the building and welding unions -whole city effectively shut down www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document


Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit