Class Notes (920,386)
CA (542,228)
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History (740)
HISB41H3 (45)
Lecture

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10 Pages
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Department
History
Course Code
HISB41H3
Professor
C Pennington

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Lecture 3Jan 31-10
The Troubled Twenties, 1919-29
-Country tramautized due to the first world war – never experienced anything like that
(60,000 Canadians dead) – led to uncertainty about the future and conservative impulse,
-Full employment during the war but Canadian govt did poor job transitioning Canadian
soldiers back into society – soldiers found themselves jobless with no assist from
government
-High unemployment
-1920s in US =roaring 20s’ but never in Canada – economy never recovered from post
war recession until 1926
William Lyon Mackenzie King
Ford Auto Workers
The Spanish Influenza, 1918-19
-Summer of 1918 new strain of influenza (thought to have come from Spain)
-Two waves of this flu spread around the war, aided in the soldiers from overseas
-Summer of 1918 – Spring of 1919 estimated 21 million people (but estimated 15 million)
died worldwide because of the flu – 3% of the entire population of the world
-Effects unevenly felt and hard to prevent
-50,000 Canadians died from this flu
-Symptons: come on rapidly, redness, swelling, hem., attacked healthy people,
overreaction of the immune system
-Mostly strong and healthy people affected by the flu
-Many soldiers who survived the western front came home only to be killed by the
influenza
-No national strategy for coping with this severe outbreak
-Federal government out of loop until 1919, created Department of Health to combat the
epidemic
Winnipeg General Strike, 1919
www.notesolution.com
Lecture 3Jan 31-10
-Winnipeg general strike of May and June 1919
-All the workers within given geographic area strike – can effectively shut down sector of
business or city itself
-Union membership doubled in world war I, wages increased but at the same time there
was government suspicions Of unions – it seemed unpatriotic
-Very large ethnic component – mostly from eastern Europe – their loyalty to Canada was
suspected, labour movement had hard time convincing government that it the union was
nothing sinister
-Went out on strike against their employers and metal working – right to collective
bargaining, permitted to bargain on behalf of all the workers
Central Strike Committee
-May 15th, general strike was called – expected that most of the 12,000 unionized workers
would strike in Winnipeg for the metal workers in sympathy
-Whole city effectively shut down
-Make sure essential services were still provided (no crimes, loss of people etc)
-Did not do anything, told the strikers to not work
-Citizens’ committee of One Thousand – organization bent on defeating the strike
oDepicted the strike in newspaper and to federal government, not to get improved
condition for workers but communist to overthrow Canada?
oCreated newspaper called ‘The Citizen
-The government unsympathetic to the workers
-Arrested many of the strikers to deport them
-June 21st 1919 protest against the actions of the government – govt responded with special
constables to break up mob on the streets, firing weapons into crowd (2 people killed, 30
injured) – ‘Bloody Saturday’ end of the strike
-Winnipeg went back to working, unions severely weakened
www.notesolution.com
Lecture 3Jan 31-10
-1920s difficult for labourers – projected harsh message to unions/strikers that they were
be smeared as traitors and perhaps killed
Arthur Meighen (1874-1960)
-Prime Minister of Canada from 1920 and 21, 1926
-Borden did not want Meighen to succeed him, felt that Meighen was too narrow minded /
mean spirited and lacked the ability to get along with other people / not broad minded
enough and not the type to lead
-Well liked within the conservative party
William Lyon Mackenzie King (1874-1950)
-PM of Canada 1921-26, 1926-30 and 1935-48
-Born in Berlin, ON and in middle class family, Kings claim to fame – his grandfather
was William Lyon Mackenzie, the great rebellion?
-Very intelligent, graduate of U of T and Harvard (PhD 1909)
-He was the only PM of Canada to have a PhD
-Became wealthy and well known as a labour lawyer and negotiator – made huge sums of
money working for US companies working out labour disputes which was critical to the
war effort but unpatriotic not serving at the front – from this he had a more positive view
of the Americans
-First elected to parliament in 1908, served as minister of labour briefly until defeat of the
Laurier government in 1911
-He stayed loyal to Laurier
-Became liberal leader from 1919-48
-Not a very charismatic person, not a good speaker, not very popular amongst the people
(defeated in his own riding several times) – but he had great talent in compromise and
conciliation, marvellous instinct, good at keeping his own party united and exposing
weaknesses in the conservative people, good at managing people
-Conservative associated with war so Liberal consistently re-elected – seemed like the best
choice
-King was a figure of national unity – he divided the country ‘the least
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Lecture 3 Jan 31-10 The Troubled Twenties, 1919-29 - Country tramautized due to the first world war never experienced anything like that (60,000 Canadians dead) led to uncertainty about the future and conservative impulse, - Full employment during the war but Canadian govt did poor job transitioning Canadian soldiers back into society soldiers found themselves jobless with no assist from government - High unemployment - 1920s in US = roaring 20s but never in Canada economy never recovered from post war recession until 1926 William Lyon Mackenzie King Ford Auto Workers The Spanish Influenza, 1918-19 - Summer of 1918 new strain of influenza (thought to have come from Spain) - Two waves of this flu spread around the war, aided in the soldiers from overseas - Summer of 1918 Spring of 1919 estimated 21 million people (but estimated 15 million) died worldwide because of the flu 3% of the entire population of the world - Effects unevenly felt and hard to prevent - 50,000 Canadians died from this flu - Symptons: come on rapidly, redness, swelling, hem., attacked healthy people, overreaction of the immune system - Mostly strong and healthy people affected by the flu - Many soldiers who survived the western front came home only to be killed by the influenza - No national strategy for coping with this severe outbreak - Federal government out of loop until 1919, created Department of Health to combat the epidemic Winnipeg General Strike, 1919 www.notesolution.com
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