Class Notes (836,839)
Canada (509,920)
Philosophy (940)
PHLB09H3 (316)
Lecture

PHLB09-3.pdf

6 Pages
55 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHLB09H3
Professor
Kelin Emmett
Semester
Fall

Description
September 19th, 2013 ● competence, decision making, children ● few words about advance directives ● “informed consent” ○ the concept of informed consent ○ standards for determining its obtainment ● the interests of others involving children in medical decisions ● informed consent reflects respect for autonomy ● what about children? ○ infants might be a clear case ■ they do not have capacity to reason, they do not have a way to communicate underlying values ○ older children ■ more mature as they get older; children may be competent in some respect to make some decisions ○ how ought physicians and HCPs respond to the preferences and wishes of child patients ○ can/should children participate in the medical decisions that can affect them ● adult models of informed consent assume that “the patient is autonomous and has a stable sense of self, established values, and mature cognitive skills” ○ do children have the relevant capacities? ■ children do not necessarily have these established values; not stable like in an adult patient ■ might not be as developed as adult patients; however, not necessarily present in adult patients either, but usually we develop set of values ■ if children lack these, how do they contribute to medical decisions> ○ how do we decide for children? ● principle of autonomy? principle of beneficence? ○ autonomy is a spectrum; you’re not suddenly autonomous when you hit 19 ○ at 10, 14, 17; there might already be an idea of what a good life is for you ○ autonomy is something that develops; we have to respect the development ○ we think it is the role of the government/medical establishment/parents to protect children from decisions they may regret (social role) ■ want to respect child’s decision making capacity, but also want to protect the child’s best interests ● is there some combination/balance that is preferable? what if they should conflict? ● 11­year old girl has rare form of cancer; has arm amputated and years of chemotherapy, had to give up cat. cancer in remission, cancer in lung comes back ○ 20% chance of survival with harsh chemo; girl does not want to ○ question is: what to do? 11­year old can identify with past experiences, can understand death (perhaps), remembers what happened a year ago ○ 20% is not a small insignificant chance; but aggressive treatment conflicts with chances family­centered ethic ● “a family centered approach considers the effects of a decision on all family members, responsibility towards one another and the burdens and benefits of a decision for each member, while acknowledging the vulnerability of the child patient” ○ not a clear­cut guide for how to make decisions. this is a model where you have to feel way through relevant moral issues ■ what is the prognosis? what is the level of competence of the child? how do we respect that? what is the interests of the family? would it be different if her chances of living is 50% ■ consider: child patient has to live with the consequences of the decision ● need to give special attention to child, but also give consideration to family ○ challenges: ■ “triadic” relationship between HCPs, parents and child patient ● what if the parents and the child disagree? ● what if the physician disagrees with the parents? ● at what point does this become child battery? when are we unnecessarily putting them through harmful treatment just to hold a hope ○ how does physician say that treatments should not be done due to unfair treatment for child ● unlike competent adults, implied everyone here has equal bearing in decision; with competent adults, physician might be important but in the end competent adults’ decisions must be respected ● paternalism is encouraged ● respect the child­­the particular patient to whom HCPs have “primary duty of care” ○ allow the child to exercise choice ina  measure appropriate to his/her level of development and experience of illness and treatment ● affirm parents’ responsibility and take seriously their concerns and wishes ● seek to harmonize the values of everyone involved ● parents have legal authority to act as the child’s surrogate decision­makers ○ obligation to decide in the best interest of the child ○ HCPS who disagree that decision is in the child’s best interest can appeal to the relevant authorities ■ constitutes some kind of negligence, abuse ■ parents who are jehovah’s witnesses and do not want child to have blood transfusion ● physicians have responsibility to inform relevant authorities; negligence if they avoid doing so ● at a point, the law steps in as well ● how do we determine that a parent is competent? ○ usually adults are competent, but currently grief­inducing situation. severe stress, severe shock ○ may not be making decisions rationally; not in a way you would otherwise make them if you weren’t in the situation ● the appropriate level of involvement of children in medical decision­making will differ depending on age; decision­making capacity, and potential harms ● the involvement of infants, primary school and adolescent minors will differ but ○ when approrpiate, each should be given information appropriate to comprehension ○ strong consideration of their preferences (eg. dissent) ■ need to attempt understand child’s reasoning ■ bring own decisions and parents’ decisions to some agreeable position ■ children is not simply shrugged off because of the child’s age and minor status ● can the “process” standard of competence help us here? ○ recall: process evaluates reasoning based on patient’s underlying goals and values. when it doesn’t, that is when we consider something problematic ■ when the patient doesn’t have underlying goals and values, that “best interests” standard kicks in ■ best interest can not conflict with underlying goals and values ■ what is the necessary level of understanding and reasoning? how certain are we that the patient has met that level? ○ how is this different? what is a situation with a child different than simply an adult situation ■ as children age, goals change; does not present present state of mind. not stable ■ even when they do, paternalism might be appropriate ■ parents’ interests ■ physician special responsibilities to children Advanced directive for resuscitation and other life­saving or life sustaining measures ● anticipating “incompetence”, the currently “competent” can express wishes regarding medical decision by: ○ advance directives ○ appointing a proxy decision maker (or both) ○ when there are both and they come apart, which one do we weigh more? ■ it depends. if AD is relevant, that carr
More Less

Related notes for PHLB09H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit