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Lecture 23

PSYA01H3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 23: Albert Bandura, Unsaturated Fat, Methane Emissions


Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYA01H3
Professor
Steve Joordens
Lecture
23

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Hemispherical Lateralization
Left Hemisphere
Right Hemisphere
Reason
Responsible for logical thinking
Focused in analysis
Responsible for language skills
Controls speech
Responsible for memorizing facts and names
Controls reading and writing abilities
Control science and mathematical capabilities
Specializes in sequential processing of
information
Controls right part of the body
Emotion
Conceives the non-verbal information
Responsible for spatial orientation
Focused in synthesis
Responsible for ability to draw pictures
Responsible for imagination
Responsible for imagination
Responsible for musicality
Creates emotion
Produces dreams
Specializes in multitasking and parallel p
information
Controls left part of the body
Types of Persuasion: Central Route and Peripheral Route
Lecture 23 (Persuasion)
Monday, November 4, 2019
11:18 AM

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What do Advertisers Do?
Nice scenery, exciting music, make the environment ideal
Want the viewer to associate the product with the experience shown
Peripheral Persuasion
Classical conditioning: associate your product/message (CR) with attractive people, places
already generate positive reactions (UCR) and that positive reaction will transfer to your p
More generally…
Associate your product/message with some desired emotional reaction by pairing it
already produces that reaction (eg. Fear, Humour, etc.)
Explains why celebrities (already liked) or experts (already trusted) are used as spok
presence generates a desired emotional response
Central Logical Argument
Establishing key points. Do not overload information
1)
Avoid abstraction. Produce verbal/visual imagery
2)
Describe benefits or penalties of the argument
3)
Use PowerPoint only when it adds value
4)
Avoid jargon
5)
Use basic building blocks
6)
Gain attention at the start
7)
Produce a clear simple summary
8)
People use this argument to change society
When you believe you can win over an argument -> use these steps
What the change will be and how we can do it (AKA buy-in)
"I want to/believe in this"
Critical Thinking is Not Natural
Albert Bandura -> Observational Learning
We do many of the things we do because we see others doing them
We mimic
In fact we have "mirror cells" that support such mimicry even when we aren't doing
B.F. Skinner -> Operant Conditioning
We have learned various other behaviours because our environment (including our
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