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Lecture

Chapter 7 Lecture Notes

4 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYA01H3
Professor
Steve Joordens

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Chapter 7 Perception Sensation vs. Perception Sensation refers to raw energy, bottom up input AB12 13 14 example tells perception kicks in with the context around the objects Brain Regions and Visual Perception Primary visual cortex is made up of a large number of modules which contain a large number of nerve cells that all respond to different aspects of the same part of the retina termed the visual field of those nerve cells The retina is not evenly represented but, instead, more primary cortex is devoted to images at or near the fovea Some nerve cells in a module respond only to lines of certain orientations, others respond only to motion, others to colour, etc Thus, primary cortex codes the basic features of the image it receives Primary visual cortex is made up of a large number of modules which contain a large number of nerve cells that all respond to different aspects of the same part of the retina termed the visual field of those nerve cells. The retina is not evenly represented but, instead, more primary cortex is devoted to images at or near the fovea. Some nerve cells in a module respond only to lines of certain orientations, others respond only to motion, others to colour, etc Thus, primary cortex codes the basic features of the image it receives Secondary visual cortex regions (i.e., association cortex) is responsible for higher level visual processes as revealed by various types of brain injury: Damage to primary visual cortex - often results in blind spots but no problems with object recognition Damage to one part of association cortex can lead to an inability to see colour altogether, a problem termed achromatopsia Damage to a slightly different part of visual association cortex can result in an inability to perceive motion Visual Agnosia and Prosopagnosia Visual agnosia when person cannot tell the function of an object Prosopagnosia inability to recognize faces, even those of very familiar people Basic Issues - Figure vs. Ground www.notesolution.com
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