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PSYB10H3 (558)
Lecture 9

Lecture 9 Notes

9 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYB10H3
Professor
Elizabeth Page- Gould

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PSYB10 Social Psychology
Lecture 9 Conformity and Dissent
Conformity, Compliance, and Obedience
Conformity change in behaviour due to the real or imagined influence of other
people
You are changing your behaviour due to influence, but this influence can be
more or less obvious to you in terms of how you change your behaviour
Compliance change in behaviour due to direct requests from another person
Key way to differentiate between conformity and compliance: Compliance is
Buy this product! Oh, maybe I should buy that product. People are aware
that they are being pressured by others
Obedience change in behaviour due to the commands of an authority figure
Usually the most extreme form
ConformityCompliance Obedience
Increasing Pressure on the Individual
They do represent an underlying process that is somewhat the same, but the
amount of pressure on you as an individual increases as you move from
conformity to compliance to obedience
Conformity
A change in behaviour due to the real or imagined influence of other people
How Does Conformity Operate?
Multiple levels of ways you can be influenced to conform
Implicit Social Influence idea of associative, things you associate with other
things, those associations are what drive your behaviour
Informational Social Influence where we look to other people and get
information from them, and that is why we change our behaviour
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Normative Social Influence trying to kind of fit in with the customs and norms
of our culture
Implicit Social Influence
Implicit Social Influence Influence caused by increasing the accessibility of
social beliefs in working memory
Typically occurs outside of awareness
The Unbearable Automaticity of Being (Bargh & Chartrand, 1999)
Method: They were trying to show that social beliefs affect you without you really
knowing that they affect you. They went into assisted living homes and they had
people participate in a word recognition task. They had groups of individuals come
and look at words that were projected onto a projector screen. These words either
contained elderly stereotypes such as slow or feeble or they had neutral words that
had nothing to do with old or young stereotypes. Their task was to categorize the
words. What Bargh and Chartrand were trying to do was to with this was present
these words and therefore present the concepts of the elderly stereotype more
accessible in their working memories.
The dependent variable: The people who were in the experiment, when they
came out of the room they had to walk down a hallway, and the experimenters timed
how long it took them to walk down the hallway. The idea is that if you are
influenced by the stereotypes of your group, then it might take you longer to walk
down that hallway.
Results: The people who were primed with the elderly stereotype walked much
slower than those who were primed with the neutral stereotype.
These people did not know that they were being influenced and did not know that
they had actually walked slower down the hallway, but the reality is that you are
influenced by what is in your working memory, which in this case is a stereotype, a
form of social influence, a set of schemas that the society as a whole has.
Informational Social Influence
Informational Social Influence the influence of other people that leads us to
conform because we see them as a source of information to guide our behaviour
Mass psychogenic illness
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Sherifs (1936) dot studies
Factors that increase informational social influence
Resisting informational social influence
Mass Psychogenic Illness
Mass Psychogenic Illness the occurrence of similar physical symptoms in a
group of people with no known physical cause
Medical school sickness
Orson Welles (1938)
War of the Worlds Broadcast 1938: Made a radio broadcast; a very well
done broadcast that sounded as if the military had taken over the airwaves
and were informing everyone that aliens had landed in New Jersey and there
were warships everywhere, people were dying, and the military had to take
over the airwaves to inform people. People started pouring into the streets
freaking out, and people clogged the highways trying to get out of town.
People were really upset but at the end of the day it was like a big practical
joke; they had hyperfocused into this particular broadcast but if they had
tuned into another radio station there could have been jazz playing and
reality would hit them, but no one bothered to do so because they paid too
much attention to what Welles was saying.
Sherifs (1936) Dot Studies
Did a set of studies that were probably the first studies on conformity
Relied on the Autokinetic Effect you see a small point and you think it moves
because when you are looking at something, your eyes do not actually stay still, they
have a movement of the eye
Your eyes jump back and forth constantly - this is called a saccade
Contributes to depth perception
Due to saccades, a single, unmoving point appears to move when you stare at
it for a while
Ex. When you see a point at the wall and you think, Is that a bug? Is that a
bug? Oh my God, it moved! Its a bug!
Key idea is that if there is a dot that doesnt move and people are not really
sure whether it moved or not, then if someone else tells them something
about how far the dot moved they might agree
Method:
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Description
PSYB10 Social Psychology Lecture 9 Conformity and Dissent Conformity, Compliance, and Obedience Conformity change in behaviour due to the real or imagined influence of other people You are changing your behaviour due to influence, but this influence can be more or less obvious to you in terms of how you change your behaviour Compliance change in behaviour due to direct requests from another person Key way to differentiate between conformity and compliance: Compliance is Buy this product! Oh, maybe I should buy that product. People are aware that they are being pressured by others Obedience change in behaviour due to the commands of an authority figure Usually the most extreme form Conformity Compliance Obedience Increasing Pressure on the Individual They do represent an underlying process that is somewhat the same, but the amount of pressure on you as an individual increases as you move from conformity to compliance to obedience Conformity A change in behaviour due to the real or imagined influence of other people How Does Conformity Operate? Multiple levels of ways you can be influenced to conform Implicit Social Influence idea of associative, things you associate with other things, those associations are what drive your behaviour Informational Social Influence where we look to other people and get information from them, and that is why we change our behaviour www.notesolution.com
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