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Psychology (8,010)
PSYB30H3 (540)
Lecture

Lecture 1 Notes

2 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYB30H3
Professor
Marc A Fournier

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1
PSYB30
Lecture 1
Personality brings a several of sub-disciplines together. Goal of discipline is to
describe individual differences how one is different from others. What are
there origins and consequences?
Where do differences in personality come from?
Grand theories of origins nature of scientific theory and how it relates to
personality
Introduction: The scientific study of the person
Freud good scientific theory of personality
Personality traits tell us about people at first acquaintance when you first
meet someone you start to learn about their personality traits psychology of
the stranger heritable, produced by environment, preserved over life course
Personality traits can be assessed in a short period of time can predict a
wide range of outcomes such as marriage, divorce, mortality, etc.
Personality traits are but an outline a sketch of the individual. What is it
beyond personality traits that we need to know to fully understand a person?
We need to know what is on a persons mind their motivations, life tasks,
etc.
- Even knowing persons motives, concerns, etc there is still more to know
about a person what we know about a person when we know ourselves
Scientific theories and constructs how they are related to each other and
related to the idea of hypotheses what is desirable in a scientific theory of
personality
Freud
Scientific theories can be reduced to a certain number of concepts, consist of
Defined constructs that are linked by rules, which suggest
Testable hypotheses
Set of interrelated statements about some phenomena in the world
Begins with systematic observation a general idea of what you are seeing
Constructs are the explanatory variables we use as psychologists an idea we
use to make sense of things we see in the world, constructs are often not
observable, intelligence is a construct.
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Description
1 PSYB30 Lecture 1 Personality brings a several of sub-disciplines together. Goal of discipline is to describe individual differences how one is different from others. What are there origins and consequences? Where do differences in personality come from? Grand theories of origins nature of scientific theory and how it relates to personality Introduction: The scientific study of the person Freud good scientific theory of personality Personality traits tell us about people at first acquaintance when you first meet someone you start to learn about their personality traits psychology of the stranger heritable, produced by environment, preserved over life course Personality traits can be assessed in a short period of time can predict a wide range of outcomes such as marriage, divorce, mortality, etc. Personality traits are but an outline a sketch of the individual. What is it beyond personality traits that we need to know to fully
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