Class Notes (922,511)
CA (542,864)
UTSC (32,932)
Psychology (8,020)
PSYB30H3 (540)
Lecture 13

Thorough notes on Lecture 13

9 Pages
67 Views

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYB30H3
Professor
Marc A Fournier

This preview shows pages 1-3. Sign up to view the full 9 pages of the document.
PSYB30 PersonalityMon, March 7/2011
Lecture 13
Overview of Week 8 Lectures
Part I: Humanism
Part II: Self-Determination
Part III: Goals & Self- Concordance
Part I
Humanistic Approaches to Psychology
Rogers' Fully Functioning Person
Maslow's Self-Actualizer
Humanism
Emerges in the 20th century as the 3rd organizing force in North American psychology
1st is Psychoanalysis
states that humans have little control of their actions and much of what we do comes from
our unconscious.
Shows humans in a darker, more evil light (negative).
2nd Behaviourism
We are the products of our learning histories
Shows humans as neutral, not good or bad, just products of our learning experiences
3rd Humanism
Adopts a much more optimistic (positive) view on humans
From the humanistic point of view, humans are essentially good
All of us come into the world with potentials, and whether we discover these potentials
depends on our environments
Views humans as rational, purposeful, and autonomous, capable of creativity and
experiencing deep and profound insights into reality
Opposing what psychoanalysis says about us, humanism states that we are conscious in what
we do, we consciously self-regulate...what we do isn't dependent on what rests
subconsciously
Carl Rogers (1902 – 1987)
A key figure in humanism and the originator of the humanistic approach to psycho-therapy
Rogers offered his own theory on personality
in contrast to previous lecture which states that there are many motives underlying
behaviour, Rogers believes that there is one single motive underlying human behaviour
The organism has but one basic tendency and striving - to actualize, maintain, and enhance the
experiencing organism. (Rogers, 1951)
He believed that inside each of us is a true self, a person we're intended to become, and as
part of our development we will realize that true person
we're all in the process of becoming the person we're meant to be
www.notesolution.com
There are environments that will both support and derail this development. How do you know
when you're taking the right steps to becoming the person you're meant to be?
Rogers speculated that there is a mechanism that informs us as to whether or not we are
taking growth promoting steps/choices in our development
He called this The Organismic Valuing Process (OVP)
Rogers believes that people don't need to be told what the right thing to do is. He believed that
all of us have this intuitive structure that feeds back to us information whether or not the choices
we're making are right or wrong, whether the choice we're going to make will actualize our true
self or frustrate it
Rogers states: Humans have a fundamental capacity to perceive the growth-relevant
implications of their experiences and choices
there's a voice in our head which tells us when we're doing something stupid
ex: when you've gotten back with that romantic partner after having broken up time and
time again, you make that reluctant decision to reunite and you feel ambivalent about it.
There is a voice inside you telling you maybe this isn't the relationship in which you
grow and thrive
Rogers will say that you don't need to be told whether or not to stay with someone, there
is a voice inside that'll tell you whether this relationship is truly meaningfully
contributing to your developing sense of self
The Fully Functioning Person
Assuming that the surrounding environment supports the individuals development and presuming we
truly listen to our Organismic Valuing Process (OVP), we are on the road to becoming (what Rogers
would call) a Fully Functioning Person – someone who is actualizing their inner potentials
Those who are on the road to becoming a FFP have particular traits that distinguish them from
those whose development is being derailed or frustrated:
Openness to Experience * (Rogers isn't referring to the O from the 5 factor model. This is a
different idea).
Characterizes how the FFP is free of the need to defensively distort the reality they
experience
The idea that they are open means that they are non-defensive, but instead, receptive to
what reality is bringing to their attention
FFP isn't overwhelmed with insecurities. They can confront the reality of things and
have the stability of character to face negative feedback, criticism, rejection, failure, etc.
Existential Living – able to live in the moment
The FFP isn't preoccupied with the past, or with the future
they aren't overwhelmed with regrets in choices they've made and they aren't
overwhelmed with feelings of apprehension about choices they have to make in the
future
they fully appreciate what the present offers
Self-Trust – they go with their gut
The FFP is able to trust their inner intuitions. They abide by what it is the OVP (voice in our
www.notesolution.com
head) is instructing us to do
they understand that their instincts lead to growth-related outcomes so they trust
themselves.
On Becoming a Person
How do we describe the qualities/prerequisites that produce a FFP more specifically?
Positive Regard – the critical ingredient to becoming a FFP
All of us have an innate need to be loved and accepted (positive regard)
we need to look at others and see that they appreciate and respect us
Conditions of Worth
Most of us though find that there are conditions attached to the worth we receive
most of us find that parents, teachers, and other socializing agents are not unconditional
in the regard they have for us. There tend to be conditions that need to be met
Most of us figure out along the way that some things lead to approval, and others lead to
disapproval
ex: parents approve of us doing well in school, and express disappointment (or
worse) when we do bad
Rogers believed that this is critical to the developing sense of self because as we grow we
are learning what things we need to do and what kinds of people we need to be in order to
secure love and attention and affection from others
this can have critical implications for your development
ex: imagine a boy growing up often hears his father often making strong negative
remarks about homosexuals, and then as the kid hits puberty he has gay thoughts. It
wouldn't take long for the boy to figure out that telling his dad about these thoughts
will draw disapproval and disrespect. As a result, these conditions of worth will bind
this boys development because certain components of his self will need to be
suppressed, or pushed away from the surface in order for the boy to grow up in a way
to secure the respect and affection of his father
ex: you grow up in an environment where if you don't get all As then you'll be met
with profound disapproval/disappointment from your parents. This implies that there
are conditions attached to your worth. You need to prove your worth before you're
met with positive regard
Conditional Positive Regard – love and approval are earned by meeting certain conditions
all of us, as we grown, learn the conditions upon which positive regard will be bestowed
in order to receive the full extent of our (for example) parents' love, approval and esteem, we
need to achieve certain milestones and become certain things (same as above)
These experiences can set us up to derail our developmental trajectory (track to becoming a
FFP)
if conditions of worth imply that certain aspects of who we are cannot be realized, or need to
be pushed out of our being, we're setting up a set of circumstances where the self will
become fragmented
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
PSYB30 Personality Mon, March 72011 Lecture 13 Overview of Week 8 Lectures Part I: Humanism Part II: Self-Determination Part III: Goals & Self- Concordance Part I Humanistic Approaches to Psychology Rogers Fully Functioning Person Maslows Self-Actualizer Humanism Emerges in the 20 century as the 3 organizing force in North American psychology st 1 is Psychoanalysis states that humans have little control of their actions and much of what we do comes from our unconscious. Shows humans in a darker, more evil light (negative). 2 Behaviourism We are the products of our learning histories Shows humans as neutral, not good or bad, just products of our learning experiences 3 Humanism Adopts a much more optimistic (positive) view on humans From the humanistic point of view, humans are essentially good All of us come into the world with potentials, and whether we discover these potentials depends on our environments Views humans as rational, purposeful, and autonomous, capable of creativity and experiencing deep and profound insights into reality Opposing what psychoanalysis says about us, humanism states that we are conscious in what we do, we consciously self-regulate...what we do isnt dependent on what rests subconsciously Carl Rogers (1902 1987) A key figure in humanism and the originator of the humanistic approach to psycho-therapy Rogers offered his own theory on personality in contrast to previous lecture which states that there are many motives underlying behaviour, Rogers believes that there is one single motive underlying human behaviour The organism has but one basic tendency and striving - to actualize, maintain, and enhance the experiencing organism. (Rogers, 1951) He believed that inside each of us is a true self, a person were intended to become, and as part of our development we will realize that true person were all in the process of becoming the person were meant to be www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document


Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit