Class Notes (838,457)
Canada (510,890)
Psychology (7,812)
PSYB30H3 (526)
Lecture

Personality Lecture Notes

21 Pages
198 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYB30H3
Professor
Jessica Dere
Semester
Winter

Description
02/25/2014 Lecture 1­ Intro to Personality • Personality:  o an individual’s characteristic patterns of thought, emotion and behavior, with psychological  mechanisms An individual’s unique and relatively consistent patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving  Basic Approaches of Personality 1. Trait Approach: focus on how people differ psychologically  2. Biological Approach: focus on understanding the mind in terms of the body 3. Psychoanalytic approach: focus on the unconscious mind and internal mental conflicts 4. Phenomenological approach: focus on the conscious experience of the world  Humanistic, cross­cultural 5. Learning/cognitive approach:  social learning: learning through observation of others and self evaluation cognitive processes:  focus on perception, memory and thought 4 Types of Data 1. S data A person’s evaluation of their personality Self­judgements or self­reports Questionnaires/surveys Most common source of information High face validity PROS: Based on large amount of information People are the best experts on self Access to inner thoughts Definitional truth Causal force­ self perception have effects on behavior Simple/easy to gather CONS: People won’t tell you People can’t tell you Lack insight or memory Overused due to simplicity 2. I Data Judgements by informants (friends, family, psychologists) Observing from a certain context Used in everyday life­ gossip, reference letters etc PROS Large amount of information Many behaviors over situation Multiple informants Based on real world observations Not in a lab setting Interpretation by common sense Context accounted for Definitial truth­ certain personality traits defined how other see you  Causal force­ reputation, people become what others expect to a certain degree CONS Limited behavioral info­ context specific Lack of access to private information Error­ imperfect memory Bias­ systematic errors, predjudice  3. L Data Verifiable real life outcomes of facts of psychological significance  Results of personality “residue” PROS: Objective  Verifiable Intrinsic importance­ reflects relevant real life outcomes (marriage, criminal record) Psychological relevance  CONS: Influenced by many non psychological factors Often psychologically caused to small degree (socioeconomic) 4. B Data • Information is systematically recorded from direct observation • Can be natural or contrived contexts Natural: based on real life; diary experience  • Naturalistic observation • PROS: realistic • CONS: costly in time and resources, context wish to observe rarely occurs Laboratory: • Experiments: make a situation happen and record behavior, seek to recreate real life context • Certain personality tests: are designed to see how a person responds to stimuli • Physiological: measurements of biological behavior (heart rate, EEG) PROS: range of contexts to create, appearance of objectivity­ tend towards reliability and  • precision but still subjective judgements must be made • CONS: uncertain interpretation­ no guarantee of meaning of behavior • Can mix the 4 types of data to increase confidence, triangulation • Discrepencies between data types can be informative (words vs fb) Lecture 2­ Research Methods • Technical training: focuses on teaching what is already known about a topic so the knowledge  can be applied • Scientific education: focuses on teaching what is known and how to find out what is not yet  known Reliability • The tendency of a measurement instrument to provide the same information on repeated occasions • Accuracy, dependability, consistency, repeatability • High reliability= low measurement error • Measurement error: cumulative effect of extraneous influences on a score; all measurement has  some error • Factors undermining reliability: o Low precision of measurement o State of participant o State of experimenter o Environment • 4 techniques that reduce error o be careful with research procedures o use standardized procedure/protocol o measure something important to participants o aggregation/averaging to cancel out random influence Validity • the degree to which measurement reflects what it is supposed to measure • meaningful/usefulness of data • measure must be reliable to be valid, but reliable measure is not always valid • constructs: cannot be seen or touched but explain things that are visible  o ex: intelligence, narcissism  • construct validation: establish validity of a measure by comparing to others, use different  measurements of the same construct Generalizability • degree to which a measure mentor result applies to other tests, other situations, other individuals • characteristics of psych research that limit generalizability: o gender bias: historically more males, presently more females in psych research o type of people that people that participate systematically differ o cohort effects: group of people living at a specific time (9/11) o socio­demographic diversity  o WEIRD: white, educated, industrialized, rich, democratic people mostly represent  research participants  Research Design 1. Case Method  • Closely study a person or event of interest to find out as much as possible • PROS: describe whole phenomena, captures complexity, source for ideas and new  hypotheses, no other possibility sometimes • CONS: not controlled, requires additional confirmation and methods 2. Experimental Method • Establishes a causal releationship between IV and DV by randomly assigning participants to  experimental groups with different levels of IV and measuring average behavior, DV of each  group • Experimental manipulation, control of IV • Statistics to see if difference is larger than expected by chance 3. Correlational Method • Establishes a relationship between 2 variables by measuring both variables in a sample • Cannot determine causality; only strength and direction of the relationship • Correlational vs. Experimental o BOTH: interested in relationship between variables o EXPERIMENT: manipulates hypothesized variable, causality, artificiality, sometimes not  possible, determines whether one variable affects the other o CORRELATION: only measures variable, shows extent to which variables are related using  correlational coefficient Significance testing • Statistically significant result: a result that would be unlikely to appear due to chance alone,  occurs by chance less than 5% of the time • Null­hypothesis significance testing: chances result was obtained if nothing was going on • Null hypothesis: no relationship between variables • Limitations: o Influenced by sample size o P 
More Less

Related notes for PSYB30H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit