Class Notes (835,004)
Canada (508,863)
Psychology (7,776)
PSYB30H3 (526)
Lecture 9

lecture 9 personality .docx

6 Pages
49 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYB30H3
Professor
Zachariah Campbell
Semester
Winter

Description
lecture 9­ march 19  2014   EARNING­BASED APPROACHES Learning: The change of behaviour as a function of experience Stimuli that occur close together in time will come to elicit the same response Behaviours followed by pleasant outcomes are more likely to be repeated behaviours followed by unpleasant outcomes are less likely to be repeated Learning approaches seek to explain personality in terms of learning principles Traditional characteristics of learning approaches: Emphasis on objectivity, focus on aspects of psychology that can be observed directly Implies that everyone should be behave the same way given the same environment or situation Strong situation perspective, behavior should be the same when person is in the environment  Tight theoretical reasoning  EHAVIOURISM The study of how a person’s behaviour is a direct result of his/her environment,  rewards and  punishments  Personality = the sum of everything you do Big focus on behavior  The causes of behaviour can be directly observed Aligns with situationist side of the person­situation debate Three kinds of learning: Habituation Classical conditioning  Operant conditioning HABITUATION A decrease in responsiveness with each repeated exposure to the same stimulus Eating something sweet. First btie is very sweet, keep eating, habituate to level of sweetness, not  as intense  Simplest form of behaviour change as a result of experience Stimulus needs to change in order to maintain the original intensity of the response in quantity etc  e.g., Winning the lottery; Habituation to portrayals of violence (loses its power)  CLASSICAL CONDITIONING­ response elicited by a stimuli (antecedent▯ behavior) Learning in which an unconditioned response that is naturally elicited by one stimulus also  becomes elicited by a new, conditioned stimulus One stimulus becomes a “warning signal” for another stimulus Pairing two stimuli, one right before the other  Involuntary, physiological processes Most famous example: Pavlov’s dogs Personality theory based on classical conditioning: A person’s personality consists of their learned repertoire of stimulus­response (S­R) connections Everyone has unique learning histories, and therefore a unique set of S­R connections OPERANT CONDITIONING – focus on consequence of behavior (Behavior ▯ consequence)  The process of learning in which an organism’s behaviour is shaped by the effect of the behaviour  on the environment Focus on the consequences of behavior  Reinforcement will increase the likelihood of behaviour Punishment will reduce the likelihood of behaviour PUNISHMENT An aversive consequence that follows a response in order to stop it and prevent its repetition Potentially problematic, can lead to negative side effects and be easily misapplied Guidelines for correct use of punishment: Availability of alternative responses Behavioural and situational specificity Need to understand when they will be punished Apply punishment immediately after the behaviour and every time it occurs Condition secondary punishing stimuli (e.g., verbal warnings) Avoid mixed messages Dangers of punishment Arouses (negative) emotion Difficult to be consistent Difficult to gauge severity of punishment  Teaches (models) misuse of power  Motivates concealment­ conceal what theyre doing, engaging in to avoid punishment  very challenging to apply punishment correctly  OCIAL LEARNING THEORY Built on behaviourism, addressing limitations of behaviourism One limitation: What about the role of insight?  Learn from more than just rewards Not only demonstrated by humans: Research with chimpanzees influenced the development of  social learning theory Reaction to shortcomi
More Less

Related notes for PSYB30H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit