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PSYB65H3 (519)
Lecture

05.12.08.PSYB65.L10.notes.doc

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Department
Psychology
Course
PSYB65H3
Professor
Zachariah Campbell
Semester
Fall

Description
LANGUAGE & THE APHASIAS 3 Processes of Language: Receptive- getting info in primary receptive area Integrative- integrating info (understanding) (“nuts and bolts”) Wernicke’s Area Expressive- getting language out (speaking and writing) Broca’s area Receptive Aphasias pure word deafness- problems in relating incoming sounds and representations which allow the understanding of discourse -a verbal language deficit -can hear sound but don’t decipher it as language (“voice comes, but words do not come”) -normal ability to read, write, and speak (can obey written commands) -BUT, cannot repeat verbal sentences, cannot obey verbal commands -involves damage to the left temporal damage (primary receptive area) Integrative Aphasias Integrating- selecting and arranging meaningful units and their eventual conversion into comprehensible, coherent speech -these aphasias vary from extreme to mild symptoms depending on size of damage Wernicke’s Aphasia -aka jargon aphasia -cannot understand verbal language -they produce fluent, BUT meaningless speech (make “unintelligible statements”, but its not really a word salad) -harmony of language is still there, (still has grammar), “melody” of language is still there, still sounds like language/speech -in extreme cases, it sounds like another language -damage to left temporal lobe -usually cannot name an object very well, depends on severity (but they will say something associated to the object, i.e. say shoe for foot) -can use objects normally -cannot obey commands -very little comprehension -usually cannot repeat verbal language unless it is a short and familiar “quip” (like “good morning”) -intelligence is low, make silly errors -can sing, with correct words if really familiar, often with jargon instead but with correct tune -they can read aloud but not comprehend (so they can’t follow written instructions) -they can write but they write the same things they speak = jargon -they are NOT aware that they have a problem Nominal Aphasia -aka Anomia -angular gyrus damage (behind Wernicke’s Area) -inability to name object (nouns) -use a similar sounding word instead -attempt circumlocution talking around something -interestingly, they cannot think of the noun, but in English language, there are many words that can be used as verbs OR nouns -they can think of the verb and say it, but can’t think of the noun (ex. Show them a comb, they say “oh, you can um use it to comb your hair”, then u ask “what is it?” and they cannot say it’s a comb!) -the easier the word, the more easily found -they also have problems in abstraction (they can’t understand statements like “ppl in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones”) -often perseverate when they
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