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Lecture 9

detailed lecture 9 notes

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University of Toronto Scarborough
Ted Petit

Lecture Notes Lecture 9:Lateralization (Left Hemisphere = Speech, Right Hemisphere = MusicSpatial) 1 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES Most of the brain lateralization information was gathered through wars (WWII) They realized that different brain damages caused different symptoms (some cant speak etc) These information are all based on adults (soldiers). Research in Brain Damages in Adults (WW2 Soldiers): Left Hemisphere Damaged Soldiers 100% of these patients show some aphasic symptoms (language problems). approximately 30% of these patients showed SOME sort of recoveries, and these were either LEFT handed individuals or theyre Ambidextrous (both-handed). The least amount of recovery was in the RIGHT handed patients. Thus they concluded that left hemisphere is responsible for language. Right Hemisphere Damaged Soldiers These soldiers showed very few language problems, and rarely did it lead to some form of aphasia. The patients that did show aphasic symptoms, were all LEFT handed or ambidextrous. Most of these left handed patients showed recovery from the language problems. Thus they suggested that Language is bilaterally represented (Language is on both hemispheres) Also, they suggested that if youre right handed, language is on your left hemisphere. If youre left handed, language is on both sides (thus if you get damaged on either sides of the brain, you will have some sort of language problems. However, the good part is that if one side of the brain is
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