Class Notes (809,497)
Canada (493,753)
Psychology (7,623)
PSYC12H3 (374)


9 Pages
Unlock Document

University of Toronto Scarborough
Michael Inzlicht

CHAPTER 7: AGEISM Butler coined the term ageism to refer to stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination based on age. Typically we refer to stereotyping and prejudice towards old people. Pro-youth, anti aging. Easy access to stereotypes about old people but very limited about young people. WHY AGEISM? The number of people over age 65 is going to double by the year 2030. Main reason? The baby boomers (those born between 1947 and 1964) are getting older. Why is it important? First, ever since the 1945, everyone has focused on the baby boomers because of the unique phenomenon they represent. Ageism is given its own chapters because of the relative lack of attention it has received from researchers who specialize in the study of stereotyping; social psychologists. The aging process represents a unique set of factors for researchers in prejudice and stereotyping. DOES AGIEMS REALLY EXIST? Mixed results. But depends a lot on the way the question is asked. Remember subcategories: They are allowed to have a close older friend, and they get to keep their stereotype of older people as a group. Brewer results: people have a generally negative view of the super ordinate category older people but have several subcategories of older people. When one meets an old people, they are organized in terms of the subcategories not the super ordinate category. When cannot place into these subcategories, then super ordinate is default choice. It appears that people not only think about older people in specific ways but in many specific ways. Examples of subcategories according to Schmidt and Boland: despondent vulnerable nosy neighbours recluse sage perfect grandparents OVER ALL, people have a more negative attitude toward older people than toward younger people. People have multiple, often contradictory, views of older people.
More Less

Related notes for PSYC12H3

Log In


Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.