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Lecture 9

Lecture 9

3 Pages
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Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCA01H3
Professor
Sheldon Ungar

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Thursday November 12, 2009 ± Lecture 9
Today READ: Brym Chapter 8
Social Stratification
-Study of social inequality (who gets what).
-Inequality is related to virtually everything (small but consistent relationship)
-For example, health problems by income. Bigger health problems between lower income levels.
Better the income better the health.
The Field Defined
-Differentiation vs. Evaluation.
-Differentiation is to notice the difference but not rating it or putting value to it.
-Evaluation is when we start to rank people. For example, weight.
-Social stratification is the way valued resources ± wealth, power, and prestige ± are distributed.
(And transmitted from one generation to the next.)
Max Weber: The Big Picture
Economy (class)
Polity (Power) Culture (Prestige, status groups)
-Three distinct dimensions which are related, but are not dependent on one another.
:HEHU¶V7KUHH+LHUDUFKLHV
-Class: Income/wealth, life chances.
-Prestige: Status groups; deference and respect.
-Power: Capacity to attain ones goals despite opposition.
-'LIIHUHQWNLQGVRIZHDOWKIRUH[DPSOHWKHFRXQWU\KRXVH³%HLQJULFKDQGVXSHUULFK´
Wealth ± US
-Lower 90% of people have 31% of wealth. Known as mostly everyone in the country.
-,QHTXDOLW\LQZHDOWKLQ&DQDGDDQGRWKHU:HVWHUQFRXQWULHVKDVLQFUHDVHVVLQFHWKHHDUO\¶V
US 400 Richest Families
-1982: $230 million average.
-1999: $2.6 billion.
Diagram from book copy down about explanations for income inequality.
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Thursday November 12, 2009 ± Lecture 9 Today READ: Brym Chapter 8 Social Stratification -Study of social inequality (who gets what). -Inequality is related to virtually everything (small but consistent relationship) -For example, health problems by income. Bigger health problems between lower income levels. Better the income better the health. The Field Defined -Differentiation vs. Evaluation. -Differentiation is to notice the difference but not rating it or putting value to it. -Evaluation is when we start to rank people. For example, weight. -Social stratification is the way valued resources ± wealth, power, and prestige ± are distributed. (And transmitted from one generation to the next.) Max Weber: The Big Picture Economy (class) Polity (Power) Culture (Prestige, status groups) -Three distinct dimensions which are related, but are not dependent on one another. :HEHU¶V7KUHH+LHUDUFKLHV -Class: Income/wealth, life chances. -Prestige: Status groups; deference and respect. -Power: Capacity to attain ones goals despite opposition. -'LIIHUHQWNLQGVRIZHDOWKIRUH[DPSOHWKHFRXQWU\KRXVH³%HLQJULFKDQGVXSHUULFK´ Wealth ± US -Lower 90% of people have 31% of wealth. Known as mostly everyone in the country. -,QHTXDOLW\LQZHDOWKLQ&DQDGDDQGRWKHU:HVWHUQFRXQWULHVKDVLQFUHDVHVVLQFHWKHHDUO\¶V US 400 Richest Families -1982: $230 million average. -1999: $2.6 billion. Diagram from book copy down about explanations for income inequality. www.notesolution.com Prestige -Recognition/deference. -Status groups: -Exclude others. -Past: identified with dress, or life style. -Blue blood: Born into (family, name). -High status means never doing anything, having servants, etc. Now Occupational Status: SES -Main source of status comes from occupation. -SES: Socio economic status. -Originally have random samples of people rate various occupations. -Now, they predict scored by combination of education and income. -Hold up broadly. Power -&DSDFLW\WRDWWDLQRQH¶VJRDOVGHVSLWHRSSRVLWLRQ -Authority: legitimate power. (Power other people recognize) -Linked to roles, especially occupational. -Power may not always be legitimate. For example, pointing a gun to you and telling you to do something. Status Consistency and Inconsistency (Pyramid diagrams) -Three hierarchies -Where do people stand? -Consistent on all three levels. -Class, status groups, and power level. -Intellectual in East Europe. High status among population. -As people move up in class they want to bring their status up together. (Status inconsistency) -Ex of inconsistency status: immigrants, organized crime. -For organized crime, they have some power, thy do not usually have status, and wealth is something that they can get. -Inconsistency has a drive for consistency and can be problematic. Social Mobility Concepts -Ascribed status -Achieved status -Closed system (caste system) -Open system (meritocracy) Social Mobility -Movement up or down especially over generations. www.notesolution.com Ascribed vs. Achieved Statuses -Ascribed statuses are those generally given to you at birth. -For example, gender, race, height. -Achieved statuses are ones you have managed to get by yourself. -For example, education. -There are also mix statuses, like intelligence or looks. -Intelligence can be achieved through family and what you do yourself. -Critical ideas. Generally, we are more favorable to achieved statuses. Open vs. Closed Systems -The caste system: ascription based, no social mobility. -Where? India, South Africa and other colonial countries. -Canada ± native population. Open System or Meritocracy -Everyone has a fair chance (level playing field) -Not everyone has the same abilities or potentials. -You get what you deserve. -3XUHPHULWRFUDF\«RULJLQVQRLPSDFW Social Mobility in Industrial Societies -More open than in the past. -Ex. Achieved > Ascribed status -Diagram: How origins affect destination. Social Mobility Model 3DUHQW¶VHGXFDWLRQ ChiOG¶VHGXFDWLRQ Childs first job Etc 3DUHQW¶VLQFRPH &KLOG¶V,4 Other variables -([SODLQDERXWRIFKLOG¶VRXWFRPHV -The rest is due to luck. College Line -Most important divide of all -Gender, class, religion, race, region. -Greater impact tKDQ« www.notesolution.comThursday November 12, 2009 Lecture 9 Today READ: Brym Chapter 8 Social Stratification -Study of social inequality (who gets what). -Inequality is related to virtually everything (small but consistent relationship) -For example, health problems by income. Bigger health problems between lower income levels. Better the income better the health. The Field Defined -Differentiation vs. Evaluation. -Differentiation is to notice the difference but not rating it or putting value to it. -Evaluation is when we start to rank people. For example, weight. -Social stratification is the way valued resources wealth, power, and prestige are distributed. (And transmitted from one generation to the next.) Max Weber: The Big Picture Economy (class)
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