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Class Notes (1,051,805)
CA (601,714)
UTSC (35,378)
Sociology (2,487)
SOCA01H3 (601)
Lecture

SOCA01H3 Lecture Notes - Solidarity, High High

10 pages35 viewsFall 2010

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCA01H3
Professor
Malcolm Mac Kinnon

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SOCIOLOGY LECTURE NOTES:
Lecture 1: Sucide
Social structure: Relatively stable patterns of social relations that affect our thoughts,
feelings, actions, and identity
3 levels of social structure:
1.Microstructures patterns of intimate social relations formed during face-
to-face interaction
2.Macrostructures patterns of social relations outside and above ones circle
of intimates and acquaintances
3.Global structures patterns of social relations outside and above the
national level
Social Integration: the movement of minority groups such as ethnic minorities, refugees
and underprivileged sections of a society into the mainstream of society
JUDISM:C ATHOLICISM:PROTESTANTISM:
SUICIDEINTERMEDIATE
SUICIDE
SUICIDE
Sociological perspective illustrated through considering causes of suicide
Suicide often regarded as a supremely antisocial and non-social act
Yet there are hidden social causes of suicide
Emile Durkheim:
At end of 19th century, demonstrated suicide rates were strongly influenced by
social forces
Examined association between rates of suicide and rates of psychological disorder
for different groups
Found suicide rates and rates of psychological disorder did not vary directly, and
often appeared to vary inversely
argued suicide rates varied as result of differences in degree of social solidarity
in different categories of the population
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Socail Solidarity - the degree to which group members share beliefs and values;
and the intensity and frequency of their interaction
Theroy of Suicide
Lecture 2: Culture
1. WHAT IS CULTURE?
(a) SOCIAL ORDER & PREDICTABILITY
(b) THE PARADOX OF CULTURE: FREEDOM &
CONSTRAINT
(c) COMMON & SOCIOLOGICAL ACCOUNTS OF CULTURE
(d) HOW DO WE GET CULTURE?
(i) SHARED
(ii) TRANSMITTED
(iii) PERCEPTION
(iv) ARBITRARY
(v) ACQUIRED
2. THE BRICKS AND MORTAR OF CULTURE
(a) VALUES
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(b) BELIEFS
(c) NORMS: REGULAR NORMS AS MORES
(i) SUB-CULTURAL NORMS
- ETHNIC
- OCCUPATIONAL
- COUNTERCULTURAL
(ii) NORMS & LAWS
(iii) THE SITUATIONALITY OF NORMS
(vi) OTHER TYPES OF NORMS
- FOLKWAYS
- CUSTOMS
- TABOOS
(b) STATUS & ROLE
(i) STATUS
(ii) ROLE
(iii) STATUS SET & ROLE SET
(iv) ROLE EXPECTATION
(v) ROLE CONFLICT & ROLE STRAIN
Origins of ulture
1.Abstraction: Capacity to create ideas or ways of thinking that allow us to classify
experience and generalize from it
2.Cooperation: Human capacity to create complex social life by establishing:
i.Norms, which are standards of behaviour or generally accepted ways of doing
things; and
ii.Values, or ideas about what is right and wrong, good and bad, beautiful and
ugly
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