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Lecture

SOCA02H3 Lecture Notes - Proletariat, Animism, Elite Theory

8 Pages
94 Views
Winter 2011

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCA02H3
Professor
Malcolm Mac Kinnon

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POLITICS
Canada, on a global stage, is as pluralistic as you can get
Power Elite Model (Karl Marx)
Bourgeoisie elite class that tends to be a small number and owns and controls the
means of production
Bourgeoisie dominates workers (the proletariat)
oTherefore called elites
oThey develop a political agenda that favours to their interests
Democracy, in 1850s, was different
oWe have work safety rules now
The bourgeoisie is less dominating now
Military, business people and government were elites in the US in 1960s (the era of
cold war)
oGave lots of power to the military
America spends a lot of money on battle groups
Military people in Canada have no power
War lords Military people called in the US
Elite theory in terms of money people who make more money, contribute more
money to the political parties
oIf you have money, you gave more political influence
Political apathy and Sinicism increase as income decreases (inverse relationship)
oIf youre apathetic politically, youre less likely to vote
Elites are not ruthless just similar people sharing similar economic interests
Domhoff elite theorist (Who rules America)
www.notesolution.com
Overlapping elites
oCorporate conservative coalition (CCC)
oLiberal labour coalition (LLC)
Businesses now, in US and Canada, are restricted in how much they can contribute
to politics
oTheres a ceiling
Business is hamstrung
The CCC is made by the upper class people
oChambers of Commerce
oCanadian Manufacturers Association
oBusiness lobby groups
The LLC is made by labour unions, liberal churches, universities, environmental
groups and protestant groups
oUniversities train for jobs in the public sectors
Privatize things owned by governments sold to private institutions
American debt is $14 trillion
oAmericas 60% of taxes collected will be paid on interest, if the debt is not
covered
Public sector unions are bankrupting government. Their bargaining rights must be
reduced.
Overlap means there are people in the business communities who are not
conservatives and liberals. Some voting liberal are wealthy, some voting conservative
poor.
Power elites are not static dont stay the same, keep changing
Mills book nuclear exchange declined during cold war
Military influences declined in the US
o6.3% spending
www.notesolution.com
Most spending in US is on entitlements (pensions, EI, old age plans)
o50% of spending
Critique of Elite Theory
Elite theory does not look upon election
People on some issues are conservative, liberal on other issues
Wind turbines kills birds, needed for energy
Pluralistic Power Theory
No single group is dominant
No group enjoys more power than the other
Negotiations and compromises are made
Democracy is obvious
Examples:
oMany people argued that pluralism is the foundation for Canadas
multiculturalism act
oPluralism at work when multiculturalism was first introduced in the 1960s,
Trudeau years, Trudeau wanted to keep Quebec in confederation
He wanted to improve the situation for French-Canadians
Bilingualism and biculturalism
oMulticultural act signed in 1972 was clear example of pluralism
oThe net is a cause and source of pluralism
Environmental groups, David Suzuki, went on the web and delivered
messages on ozone depletion, biodiversity and global warming
oWeb has been used to carry out, publicize pluralism in China, Mexico,
Malaysia, and Indonesia called cyber activism
www.notesolution.com

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Description
POLITICS Canada, on a global stage, is as pluralistic as you can get Power Elite Model (Karl Marx) Bourgeoisie elite class that tends to be a small number and owns and controls the means of production Bourgeoisie dominates workers (the proletariat) o Therefore called elites o They develop a political agenda that favours to their interests Democracy, in 1850s, was different o We have work safety rules now The bourgeoisie is less dominating now Military, business people and government were elites in the US in 1960s (the era of cold war) o Gave lots of power to the military America spends a lot of money on battle groups Military people in Canada have no power War lords Military people called in the US Elite theory in terms of money people who make more money, contribute more money to the political parties o If you have money, you gave more political influence Political apathy and Sinicism increase as income decreases (inverse relationship) o If youre apathetic politically, youre less likely to vote Elites are not ruthless just similar people sharing similar economic interests Domhoff elite theorist (Who rules America) www.notesolution.com
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