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Lecture 10

SOCB26H3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 10: Deconstruction, Afrocentrism, School Choice


Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCB26H3
Professor
Julian Tanner
Lecture
10

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SOCB26- March, 27, 2012
Lecture 10
2. The rise of the Shopping Mall High School: wide range of choices and variety in courses/
electives/ extracurricular activities in order to accommodate different student needs.
- Critique of the Shopping Mall High School:
- Encouraged mediocrity, rather than excellence.
- While high standards were okay in core subjects, electives were expected to be easier
School organization: from the Shopping Mall High School to Private Schools and more
choice
A backlash against the Shopping Mall High School has led to:
Demands that educational standards improve
A market-driven rise private schooling
A school choice ethos which has seen increased numbers of speciality schools in both
public and private education
While expansion of private sector education signifies that getting a good education is
becoming ever more competitive, there is little evidence that private schools provide a
better education than the public system
equity: most families can't afford private education - The deregulation of fees for
professional programs in university has squeezed out students from middle-class families
High school should be neutral about the decisions a student makes, i.e. if a student chooses to
take academic or applied courses. How have variety and choice become a characteristic of high
school? This is keeping the customers satisfied. The school would recognize that different
students have different tastes and needs. It is the obligations of the shopping mall high school to
offer many options. This is to try and make sure that the majority of the population get their
education. High dropout rate is an indicator of a failing school.
Back in the day, schools were focused only on academic excellence, but today in shopping mall
high schools there is no emphasis on academic achievements. Informal norms about how tough
certain courses should or would be have formed. The unofficial rules of the shopping mall high
school have designated electives as the easier courses. Teachers expect less in electives. It would
seem as if the teacher was breaking the rules if they had high expectations of the students in
elective courses. And those teachers teaching core courses can have higher expectations. Davie’s
and Guppies say that shopping mall schools encourage students to do their own streaming b/c the
school remains officially neutral. Their own streaming is a consequence of the shopping mall
school.
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